Plato


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Related to Plato: Aristotle, Socrates

Pla·to

 (plā′tō) 427?-347? bc.
Greek philosopher noted for his many written dialogues in which his mentor Socrates appears as the central character. The best known of these, The Republic, expounds Plato's idealist philosophy and describes a hypothetical utopian state ruled by thinkers. He taught and wrote for much his life at the Academy, which he founded near Athens around 386.

Plato

(ˈpleɪtəʊ)
n
(Biography) ?427–?347 bc, Greek philosopher: with his teacher Socrates and his pupil Aristotle, he is regarded as the initiator of western philosophy. His influential theory of ideas, which makes a distinction between objects of sense perception and the universal ideas or forms of which they are an expression, is formulated in such dialogues as Phaedo, Symposium, and The Republic. Other works include The Apology and Laws

Plato

(ˈpleɪtəʊ)
n
(Astronomy) a crater in the NW quadrant of the moon, about 100 km in diameter, that has a conspicuous dark floor

Pla•to

(ˈpleɪ toʊ)

n.
427–347 B.C., Greek philosopher.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Plato - ancient Athenian philosopherPlato - ancient Athenian philosopher; pupil of Socrates; teacher of Aristotle (428-347 BC)
Athens, Athinai, capital of Greece, Greek capital - the capital and largest city of Greece; named after Athena (its patron goddess); "in the 5th century BC ancient Athens was the world's most powerful and civilized city"
Translations
Platón
Platon
Platon
Plato

Plato

[ˈpleɪtəʊ] NPlatón

Plato

nPlato(n) m

Plato

[ˈpleɪtəʊ] nPlatone m
References in classic literature ?
THE Republic of Plato is the longest of his works with the exception of the Laws, and is certainly the greatest of them.
We may judge from the noble commencement of the Timaeus, from the fragment of the Critias itself, and from the third book of the Laws, in what manner Plato would have treated this high argument.
In what relation the Apology of Plato stands to the real defence of Socrates, there are no means of determining.
The answer which is given by Plato is paradoxical enough, and seems rather intended to stimulate than to satisfy enquiry.
In an early dialogue of Plato's, the Protagoras, Socrates asks Protagoras why it is not as easy to find teachers of virtue as it is to find teachers of swordsmanship, riding, or any other art.
Plato, writing probably in the next generation, undertakes the defence of his friend and master in this particular, not to the Athenians of his day, but to posterity and the world at large.
Take such a proposition as "Socrates precedes Plato." Here the word "precedes" is just as solid as the words "Socrates" and "Plato"; it MEANS a relation, but is not a relation.
Volumes of German morality were hand and glove with the gridiron - a toasting-fork might be discovered by the side of Eusebius - Plato reclined at his ease in the frying-pan- and contemporary manuscripts were filed away upon the spit.
Of which kind also, Plato, in his Protagoras, bringeth in Prodius in scorn, and maketh him make a speech, that consisteth of distinction from the beginning to the end.
How many, think ye, have likewise fallen into Plato's honey head, and sweetly perished there?
Of late in Moscow and in the country, since he had become convinced that he would find no solution in the materialists, he had read and reread thoroughly Plato, Spinoza, Kant, Schelling, Hegel, and Schopenhauer, the philosophers who gave a non-materialistic explanation of life.
Aristotle was again vitalized, and Plato's noble idealistic philosophy was once more appreciatively studied and understood.