playa

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pla·ya

 (plī′ə)
n.
A nearly level area at the bottom of an undrained desert basin, sometimes temporarily covered with water.

[Spanish, from Late Latin plagia, hillside, shoreline, probably from Greek, sides, from neuter pl. of plagios, oblique, sideways; see plagio-.]

playa

(ˈplɑːjə; Spanish ˈplaja)
n
(Physical Geography) (in the US) a temporary lake, or its dry often salty bed, in a desert basin
[Spanish: shore, from Late Latin plagia, from Greek plagios slanting, from plagos side; compare French plage beach]

pla•ya

(ˈplaɪ ə)

n., pl. -yas.
the flat, central floor of a desert basin with interior drainage.
[1850–55; < Sp: shore < Late Latin plagia; see plage]

pla·ya

(plī′ə)
A dry lake bed at the bottom of a desert basin, sometimes temporarily covered with water. Playas have no vegetation and are among the flattest geographical features in the world.

playa

A Spanish word meaning shore, used to mean a flat area at the bottom of a desert basin.
Translations

playa

n (Geol) → Playa f, → Salztonebene f
References in periodicals archive ?
These playa lakes contain brines enriched in salts such as potassium salts.
The Llano Estacado of the Texas Panhandle has the highest density of playa lakes in the world (Bolen et al.
Other waters covered in the definition include: intrastate lakes, rivers, streams (including intermittent streams), mudflats, sand flats, wetlands, sloughs, prairie potholes, wet meadows, playa lakes, or natural ponds.
A possible explanation for the patterns we observed is the intensive cultivation of the landscape around the playa lakes, and hence colonies, in our study area (Smith, 2003) compared to open grasslands and grazing lands present throughout much of the range of black-tailed prairie dogs.
have introduced the Clean Water Restoration Act, which would replace the phrase "navigable waters" with "waters of the United States," by which they mean "all waters subject to the ebb and flow of the tide, the territorial seas, and all interstate and intrastate waters and their tributaries, including lakes, rivers, streams (including intermittent streams), mudflats, sandflats, wetlands, sloughs, prairie potholes, wet meadows, playa lakes, natural ponds, and all impoundments of the foregoing.
At Lubbock, about 100 miles south of Bushland, ARS plant physiologist Dennis Gitz is studying the recharge of the Ogallala Aquifer from playa lakes.
Playa lakes of the Southern High Plains represent one of the more unique inland aquatic habitats of North America and have received considerable attention due to both their unusual biological and physical characteristics (Reeves 1966; Rowell 1971; Home 1974; Osterkamp & Wood 1987; Proctor 1990; Smith 2003; Haukos & Smith 2004).
The majority of our local drainage occurs via the surface into playa lakes, shallow depressions in the surface of the ground which become small lakes when filled with rain and storm water runoff.
Examples included a 150-mile-long river in New Mexico, wetlands in one of Florida's most important watersheds, headwater streams in Appalachia, playa lakes in the Southwest, a 69 mi long canal used as a drinking water supply, and an 86 ac lake in Wisconsin.
In the past, when the National Weather Service issued warnings and the storm clouds moved in over Lubbock, Texas, residents living near the playa lakes shuddered.
Though playa water is used conjunctively as a supplemental irrigation source by some farmers, the playa lakes are too small and fill too irregularly to be of significance for direct urban consumption (Templer, 1990).