pleonexia


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pleonexia

(ˌpliːəˈnɛksɪə)
n
excessive greed
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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The major problem was, as always, "the lust for more" (pleonexia, insatiableness, badly rendered as "greed")--the desire of the vulgar (phaulous) to get as much as they can from the public treasury, regardless of desert (Balot 2001).
Williams objects that Aristotle cannot plausibly reduce acts of injustice to pleonexia because such acts are often motivated by vices that are contrary, not to justice, but to, say, temperance or courage.
* greed (kerdos, pleonexia), that is, coveting wealth, voracious
It should be easy to conclude, as Aristotle did, that pleonexia (greed) is a negative conduct.
So esta ultima pode combinar a imparcialidade exigida pela igualdade politica com a cobica ou o sentimento de inveja, postos em movimento pela pleonexia pessoais (10).
However, it is precisely here where Eve's narcissistic thespian pleonexia (over-reaching) leads her to her final fate.
"Pleonexia" basically meant the desire to have things without regard to real need or the common good.
(Friar 143) The poverty of Cavafy's Ithaca is contrasted to the rich adventure it made possible, and corresponds to Camus' attack on what Plato characterized as pleonexia (insatiable appetite and greed) in the Republic.