Plunket Society


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Related to Plunket Society: Plunket nurse

Plunket Society

n
(Social Welfare) the Royal New Zealand Society for the Health of Women and Children
[named after Sir William Lee Plunket (1864–1920), Governor General of New Zealand at the time of its founding (1907)]
References in periodicals archive ?
Before joining the ministry, Hussey worked for 17 years for the Plunket Society in clinical and policy roles, supporting maternal child work and the Children's Action Plan.
Since 2011, an extended Well Child/Tamariki Ora (WC/TO) service has been provided through the Royal New Zealand Plunket Society (Inc) (Plunket) to vulnerable teenage mothers in Hawke's Bay.
The Royal New Zealand Plunket Society (known as Plunket) provides well child services to 90% of children and their families nationwide, and to 65% of Maori children born in 2010 (Royal New Zealand Plunket Society, 2012).
For example, he wore navy dungarees with a yacht design on the front for his "crawlabout" at a creche organised by The Royal New Zealand Plunket Society at Government House in Wellington.
1,840 will purchase additional infant and child seats for the Te Anau and Fiordland Plunket Society s Southland Area car seat service.
The Plunket Society, in New Zealand, organized one of the earliest known efforts to promote reading to children, in 1907.
The study received ethics approval in December 2002 from the Massey Human Ethics Committee, the Auckland Health and Disability Ethics Committee, and the Plunket Society Ethics Committee.
In 1907 King founded The Royal New Zealand Society for the Health of Women and Children, now commonly known as the Plunket Society after the Society's patroness, Lady Plunket.
As part of Starbucks commitment towards contributing positively to the communities, a percentage of the net proceeds from the opening day will benefit a local chapter of the Plunket Society, the major provider of well child health services in New Zealand.
THE FORMER head of the Royal New Zealand Plunket Society and a Catholic nursing sister who gave many years of service to the Mary Potter Hospice in Wellington have both received Queen's Birthday honours.
The ideology of perfect motherhood was played out in the suburban streets and back roads of most towns and cities throughout the country with mothers expected to spend their time at home with their children, adhering to what was now seen as the normal 'scientific' approach to child rearing and child birth advocated by the Royal New Zealand Plunket Society.
The pilot service was a Royal New Zealand Plunket Society (Inc) (Plunket) initiative to improve the engagement of Hawke's Bay teenage mothers in the WC/TO service and to better meet their parenting needs.