pluralism

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plu·ral·ism

 (plo͝or′ə-lĭz′əm)
n.
1. The condition of being multiple or plural.
2.
a. A condition in which numerous distinct ethnic, religious, or cultural groups are present and tolerated within a society.
b. The belief that such a condition is desirable or socially beneficial.
3. Ecclesiastical The holding by one person of two or more positions or offices, especially two or more ecclesiastical benefices, at the same time.
4. Philosophy
a. The doctrine that reality is composed of many ultimate substances.
b. The belief that no single explanatory system or view of reality can account for all the phenomena of life.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

pluralism

(ˈplʊərəˌlɪzəm)
n
1. (Ecclesiastical Terms) the holding by a single person of more than one ecclesiastical benefice or office
2. (Sociology) sociol a theory of society as several autonomous but interdependent groups which either share power or continuously compete for power
3. (Sociology) the existence in a society of groups having distinctive ethnic origin, cultural forms, religions, etc
4. (Industrial Relations & HR Terms) a theory that views the power of employers as being balanced by the power of trade unions in industrial relations such that the interests of both sides can be catered for
5. (Philosophy) philosophy
a. the metaphysical doctrine that reality consists of more than two basic types of substance. Compare monism2, dualism2
b. the metaphysical doctrine that reality consists of independent entities rather than one unchanging whole. Compare monism2, absolutism2b
ˈpluralist n, adj
ˌpluralˈistic adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

plu•ral•ism

(ˈplʊər əˌlɪz əm)

n.
1. (in philosophy)
a. a theory that there is more than one basic substance or principle. Compare dualism (def. 2a), monism (def. 1a).
b. a theory that reality consists of two or more independent elements.
2.
a. a condition in which minority groups participate fully in the dominant society, yet maintain their cultural differences.
b. a doctrine that society benefits from such a condition.
3. the holding by one person of two or more church offices at the same time.
4. the state or quality of being plural.
[1810–20]
plu′ral•ist, n., adj.
plu`ral•is′tic, adj.
plu`ral•is′ti•cal•ly, adv.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

pluralism

1. Ecclesiastic. the holding of two or more church offices by a single person.
2. the state or condition of a common civilization in which various ethnic, racial, or religious groups are free to participate in and develop their common cultures.
3. a policy or principle supporting such cultural plurality. — pluralist, n. — pluralistic, adj.
See also: Politics
1. a theory positing more than one principle or basic substance as the ground of reality. Cf. dualism, monism.
2. a theory that reality consists, not of an organic whole, but of two or more independent material or spiritual entities. — pluralist, n.pluralistic, adj.
See also: Philosophy
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

pluralism

1. The belief that there are more than one or two substances in the world, such as mind and matter.
2. A situation in which several different ethnic or cultural groups coexist within a society.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pluralism - a social organization in which diversity of racial or religious or ethnic or cultural groups is tolerated
social organisation, social organization, social structure, social system, structure - the people in a society considered as a system organized by a characteristic pattern of relationships; "the social organization of England and America is very different"; "sociologists have studied the changing structure of the family"
2.pluralism - the doctrine that reality consists of several basic substances or elements
doctrine, ism, philosophical system, philosophy, school of thought - a belief (or system of beliefs) accepted as authoritative by some group or school
monism - the doctrine that reality consists of a single basic substance or element
3.pluralism - the practice of one person holding more than one benefice at a time
practice, pattern - a customary way of operation or behavior; "it is their practice to give annual raises"; "they changed their dietary pattern"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
pluralizam

pluralism

[ˈplʊərəlɪzəm] Npluralismo m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

pluralism

[ˈplʊərəlɪzəm] npluralisme m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

pluralism

nPluralismus m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

pluralism

[ˈplʊərəˌlɪzm] npluralismo
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
In 1985, in her Eleanor Clarke Slagle lecture, Mosey (for whom this lecture is dedicated) proposed that the profession adopt a pluralistic perspective that acknowledges that occupational therapists may use a variety of interventions to meet their clients' needs.
According to the pluralistic perspective, which recognises value pluralism, commensurability is not a prerequisite for rational choice (Costa and Caldas, 2011; Dewey, 1930 [1922]), as long as rational choice is understood, not as the maximisation of a one-dimensional value function, as in neoclassical economics, but simply as choice grounded in good reasons.
Because of the progress made during and since Vatican II in the Catholic Church's significant move toward a more pluralistic perspective in its inclusivism, it seems that the issue of exclusivism tends to be more problematic from the Muslim side today.
It fulfilled its role successfully when it portrayed the country and society from a pluralistic perspective. But the ongoing quarrel is spreading like an oil stain.
You state that "In Turkey, expressing different opinions and thoughts freely on the events of 1915 is the requirement of a pluralistic perspective as well as of a culture of democracy and modernity." This lofty sentiment creates the impression that you are open and caring about truth, when, in fact, you are using it as a Trojan horse and a blatant political stratagem to play with the minds of the general public.
While the book certainly focuses on alienation and belonging, there has been little attempt to approach the issue from a pluralistic perspective. Most of the contributors received their education in Istanbul or Ankara (excepting Osman Sahin, who graduated from the Dicle Teachers' Training Institute).