Plutarch


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Plu·tarch

 (plo͞o′tärk′) Originally Mestrius Plutarchus. ad 46?-120?
Greek biographer and philosopher. He wrote Parallel Lives, a collection of paired biographies of famous Greek and Roman figures that Shakespeare used as source material for his Roman plays.

Plu·tarch′an (-tär′kən), Plu·tarch′i·an (-tär′kē-ən) adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Plutarch

(ˈpluːtɑːk)
n
(Biography) ?46–?120 ad, Greek biographer and philosopher, noted for his Parallel Lives of distinguished Greeks and Romans
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Plu•tarch

(ˈplu tɑrk)

n.
A.D. c46–c120, Greek biographer.
Plu•tarch′i•an, adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Plutarch - Greek biographer who wrote Parallel Lives (46?-120 AD)Plutarch - Greek biographer who wrote Parallel Lives (46?-120 AD)
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
Plutarch
Plutarque
플루타르크
Plutarch

Plutarch

[ˈpluːtɑːk] NPlutarco
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

Plutarch

nPlutarch m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

Plutarch

[ˈpluːtɑːk] nPlutarco
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
(saith he) I had rather a great deal, men should say, there was no such man at all, as Plutarch, than that they should say, that there was one Plutarch, that would eat his children as soon as they were born; as the poets speak of Saturn.
Critics from Plutarch downwards have almost unanimously rejected the lines 654-662, on the ground that Hesiod's Amphidamas is the hero of the Lelantine Wars between Chalcis and Eretria, whose death may be placed circa 705 B.C.
Fortunately the books were written in the language, the elements of which I had acquired at the cottage; they consisted of Paradise Lost, a volume of Plutarch's Lives, and the Sorrows of Werter.
"Plutarch? Nothing of the sort!" answered Genestas.
Anna Pavlovna's circle on the contrary was enraptured by this enthusiasm and spoke of it as Plutarch speaks of the deeds of the ancients.
"I read a good deal in Daniel's English History of France; a great deal in Plutarch's Lives, the Atalantis, Pope's Homer, Dryden's Plays, Chillingworth, the Countess D'Aulnois, and Locke's Human Understanding.
"Or of wisdom, my dear baron -- or of wisdom," said Louis XVIII., laughing; "the greatest captains of antiquity amused themselves by casting pebbles into the ocean -- see Plutarch's life of Scipio Africanus."
"Still, men of great intelligence, such as Plutarch, Swedenborg, Bernardin de St.
The Gracchi, Agis, Cleomenes, and others of Plutarch's heroes, do not in the record of facts equal their own fame.
The Wars of the Jews, likewise languishing under Mr Wegg's generalship, Mr Boffin arrived in another cab with Plutarch: whose Lives he found in the sequel extremely entertaining, though he hoped Plutarch might not expect him to believe them all.
And Solon, according to Plutarch, was in a manner compelled, by the universal suffrage of his fellow-citizens, to take upon him the sole and absolute power of new-modeling the constitution.
But when Mary wrote a little book for her boys, called "Stories of Great Men, taken from Plutarch," and had it printed and published by Gripp & Co., Middlemarch, every one in the town was willing to give the credit of this work to Fred, observing that he had been to the University, "where the ancients were studied," and might have been a clergyman if he had chosen.