Plutarch

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Plu·tarch

 (plo͞o′tärk′) Originally Mestrius Plutarchus. ad 46?-120?
Greek biographer and philosopher. He wrote Parallel Lives, a collection of paired biographies of famous Greek and Roman figures that Shakespeare used as source material for his Roman plays.

Plu·tarch′an (-tär′kən), Plu·tarch′i·an (-tär′kē-ən) adj.

Plutarch

(ˈpluːtɑːk)
n
(Biography) ?46–?120 ad, Greek biographer and philosopher, noted for his Parallel Lives of distinguished Greeks and Romans

Plu•tarch

(ˈplu tɑrk)

n.
A.D. c46–c120, Greek biographer.
Plu•tarch′i•an, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Plutarch - Greek biographer who wrote Parallel Lives (46?-120 AD)Plutarch - Greek biographer who wrote Parallel Lives (46?-120 AD)
Translations
Plutarch
Plutarque
플루타르크
Plutarch

Plutarch

[ˈpluːtɑːk] NPlutarco

Plutarch

nPlutarch m

Plutarch

[ˈpluːtɑːk] nPlutarco
References in periodicals archive ?
It is tempting to try to cut and paste all the references to Epaminondas from the Life of Agesilaus and the Life of Pelopidas together with the references to Epaminondas from the Moralia into a skeletal version of a "typical" Plutarchian biography with relative placement of the passages based on the chronology of Epaminondas's life (although the chronological placement for some of the references is blurry and difficult).
In places where progressive drawing masters meet civil servants and newspaper men,' he wrote, 'you may still hear opposed in high Plutarchian fashion the art of Picasso to the art of Matisse.
I can offer no better summary of (or commentary on) the book's fourth and final chapter than Heffernan himself: "By exposing the overlooked subtextual strata that work to put forward the figuration of Caesar as godly-demonic lion, I hope to liberate Julius Caesar from its exegetic capture as Plutarchian forensic-battlefield psychodrama" (156, emphasis in original).
IN HIS PLUTARCHIAN BIOGRAPHIES OF THE American Founders, Richard Brookhiser observes that while certain American settlements arose from lofty aspirations--the Puritanism of Boston, the Quakerism of Philadelphia (whose very name underscores its ambition), the religious tolerance of Maryland and Rhode Island--New York "has always been the city of getting, spending, and getting ahead.
Thus, I would argue that from both a Plutarchian and Phaedrean point of view the novel ends on a fitting (and serious) philosophical-religious high note.
Brought up in an international environment and professionally dedicated to travel writing, Nestor is able to rewrite Gal's life from a Plutarchian perspective, without being haunted by nostalgic trauma.
54) Plutarchian crocodiles, however, are kin to Leviathan, the monstrous enemy to all of creation, excepting Isis and her disciples:
By understanding the Homeric and in particular the Plutarchian allusions, we see that 'Byron's rebellion stands out as a kind of inspired madness, doomed to a fatal outcome' (p.
Kennedy and Lyndon Johnson, is a seasoned historian who follows the Plutarchian model of letting the evidence speak for itself.