Pluto


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pluto

demote or devalue a person or thing; a pluto (not capitalized) is someone or something that has lost its status (On August 24, 2006, the International Astronomical Union, which decides the official names of all celestial bodies, stated that Pluto was not a true planet because it’s “too small and doesn’t dominate its neighborhood.” They dubbed Pluto a dwarf planet. This means that there are now only eight planets in the solar system.)
Abused, Confused, & Misused Words by Mary Embree Copyright © 2007, 2013 by Mary Embree

Plu·to

 (plo͞o′tō)
n.
1. Roman Mythology The god of the dead and the ruler of the underworld, identified with the Greek Hades.
2. A dwarf planet having a sidereal period of revolution about the sun of 248.5 years, a highly elliptical orbit with a perihelion distance of 4.4 billion kilometers (2.8 billion miles) and an aphelion distance of 7.4 billion kilometers (4.6 billion miles), and a mean equatorial diameter of 2,302 kilometers (1,485 miles), less than half that of Earth. Until 2006, Pluto was classified as the ninth planet in the solar system. See Usage Note at planet.

[Latin Plūtō, Plūtōn-, from Greek Ploutōn, from ploutos, wealth (from the belief that the underworld was the source of wealth from the ground); see pleu- in Indo-European roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Pluto

(ˈpluːtəʊ)
n
(Classical Myth & Legend) classical myth the god of the underworld; Hades

Pluto

(ˈpluːtəʊ)
n
(Celestial Objects) the second-largest dwarf planet in the solar system, located in the Kuiper belt; discovered in 1930 by Clyde Tombaugh (1906–97); classified as a planet until 2006, when it was reclassified as a dwarf planet. It has a diameter of 2390 km
vb (tr)
1. to reduce (something) in status or importance
2. to put an end to (something)
[Latin, from Greek Ploutōn, literally: the rich one]

PLUTO

(ˈpluːtəʊ)
n
(Historical Terms) the code name of pipelines laid under the English Channel to supply fuel to the Allied forces landing in Normandy in 1944
[C20: from p(ipe)l(ine) u(nder) t(he) o(cean)]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Plu•to

(ˈplu toʊ)

n.
2. the planet ninth in order from the sun, having an equatorial diameter of about 1400 mi. (2250 km), a mean distance from the sun of 3.674 billion mi. (5.914 billion km), a period of revolution of 248.53 years, and one known moon.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

Plu·to

(plo͞o′tō)
A dwarf planet that until 2006 was classified as the ninth planet in our solar system. It has a diameter about one-sixth that of Earth. It orbits the sun once every 248 years. Its orbit crosses that of Neptune. It has an average surface temperature of -369°F (-223°C). See Table at solar system. See Note at planet.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pluto - a cartoon character created by Walt DisneyPluto - a cartoon character created by Walt Disney
2.pluto - (Greek mythology) the god of the underworld in ancient mythologyPluto - (Greek mythology) the god of the underworld in ancient mythology; brother of Zeus and husband of Persephone
Greek mythology - the mythology of the ancient Greeks
3.Pluto - a small planet and the farthest known planet from the sun; it has the most elliptical orbit of all the planets; "Pluto was discovered by Clyde Tombaugh in 1930"
solar system - the sun with the celestial bodies that revolve around it in its gravitational field
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
Pluto
Pluto
Pluuto
Pluto
PlutoPluton
Pluto
HadPluton
Pluto
Diêm Vương Tinh

Pluto

[ˈpluːtəʊ] N (Astron, Myth) → Plutón m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

Pluto

n (Myth) → Pluto m, → Pluton m; (Astron) → Pluto m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

Pluto

[ˈpluːtəʊ] n (Astron, Myth) → Plutone m
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
They call my name Pluto; and I am the king of diamonds and all other precious stones.
She could not recall a line of them, for Jove had decreed that the memory of them abide in Pluto's painful domain, as a part of the apparatus.
Pluto - this was the cat's name - was my favorite pet and playmate.
For the helmet of Pluto, which maketh the politic man go invisible, is secrecy in the counsel, and celerity in the execution.
This hole was the "Black Lake"; it was Pluto, a deep circle which can be conveniently studied from the earth, between the last quarter and the new moon, when the shadows fall from west to east.
The Mediterranean, the blue sea par excellence, "the great sea" of the Hebrews, "the sea" of the Greeks, the "mare nostrum" of the Romans, bordered by orange-trees, aloes, cacti, and sea-pines; embalmed with the perfume of the myrtle, surrounded by rude mountains, saturated with pure and transparent air, but incessantly worked by underground fires; a perfect battlefield in which Neptune and Pluto still dispute the empire of the world!
"Lower away the basket with the shekels of silver!" here shouted a Roman soldier in a hoarse, rough voice, which appeared to issue from the regions of Pluto "lower away the basket with the accursed coin which it has broken the jaw of a noble Roman to pronounce!
First, wear this girdle; then appear Invisible to all are here: The planets seven, the gloomy air, Hell, and the Furies' forked hair, Pluto's blue fire, and Hecat's tree, With magic spells so compass thee, That no eye may thy body see!
(15) who with the lord Apollo and the Rivers have youths in their keeping -- to this charge Zeus appointed them -- Peitho, and Admete, and Ianthe, and Electra, and Doris, and Prymno, and Urania divine in form, Hippo, Clymene, Rhodea, and Callirrhoe, Zeuxo and Clytie, and Idyia, and Pasithoe, Plexaura, and Galaxaura, and lovely Dione, Melobosis and Thoe and handsome Polydora, Cerceis lovely of form, and soft eyed Pluto, Perseis, Ianeira, Acaste, Xanthe, Petraea the fair, Menestho, and Europa, Metis, and Eurynome, and Telesto saffron-clad, Chryseis and Asia and charming Calypso, Eudora, and Tyche, Amphirho, and Ocyrrhoe, and Styx who is the chiefest of them all.
We offered first a prayer To Pluto and the goddess of cross-ways, With contrite hearts, to deprecate their ire.
A blight is on our harvest in the ear, A blight upon the grazing flocks and herds, A blight on wives in travail; and withal Armed with his blazing torch the God of Plague Hath swooped upon our city emptying The house of Cadmus, and the murky realm Of Pluto is full fed with groans and tears.
We must also expunge the verse, which tells us how Pluto feared, Lest the mansions grim and squalid which the gods abhor should he seen both of mortals and immortals.