Pluto


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Plu·to

 (plo͞o′tō)
n.
1. Roman Mythology The god of the dead and the ruler of the underworld, identified with the Greek Hades.
2. A dwarf planet having a sidereal period of revolution about the sun of 248.5 years, a highly elliptical orbit with a perihelion distance of 4.4 billion kilometers (2.8 billion miles) and an aphelion distance of 7.4 billion kilometers (4.6 billion miles), and a mean equatorial diameter of 2,302 kilometers (1,485 miles), less than half that of Earth. Until 2006, Pluto was classified as the ninth planet in the solar system. See Usage Note at planet.

[Latin Plūtō, Plūtōn-, from Greek Ploutōn, from ploutos, wealth (from the belief that the underworld was the source of wealth from the ground); see pleu- in Indo-European roots.]

Pluto

(ˈpluːtəʊ)
n
(Classical Myth & Legend) classical myth the god of the underworld; Hades

Pluto

(ˈpluːtəʊ)
n
(Celestial Objects) the second-largest dwarf planet in the solar system, located in the Kuiper belt; discovered in 1930 by Clyde Tombaugh (1906–97); classified as a planet until 2006, when it was reclassified as a dwarf planet. It has a diameter of 2390 km
vb (tr)
1. to reduce (something) in status or importance
2. to put an end to (something)
[Latin, from Greek Ploutōn, literally: the rich one]

PLUTO

(ˈpluːtəʊ)
n
(Historical Terms) the code name of pipelines laid under the English Channel to supply fuel to the Allied forces landing in Normandy in 1944
[C20: from p(ipe)l(ine) u(nder) t(he) o(cean)]

Plu•to

(ˈplu toʊ)

n.
2. the planet ninth in order from the sun, having an equatorial diameter of about 1400 mi. (2250 km), a mean distance from the sun of 3.674 billion mi. (5.914 billion km), a period of revolution of 248.53 years, and one known moon.

Plu·to

(plo͞o′tō)
A dwarf planet that until 2006 was classified as the ninth planet in our solar system. It has a diameter about one-sixth that of Earth. It orbits the sun once every 248 years. Its orbit crosses that of Neptune. It has an average surface temperature of -369°F (-223°C). See Table at solar system. See Note at planet.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Pluto - a cartoon character created by Walt DisneyPluto - a cartoon character created by Walt Disney
2.Pluto - (Greek mythology) the god of the underworld in ancient mythologyPluto - (Greek mythology) the god of the underworld in ancient mythology; brother of Zeus and husband of Persephone
Greek mythology - the mythology of the ancient Greeks
3.Pluto - a small planet and the farthest known planet from the sun; it has the most elliptical orbit of all the planets; "Pluto was discovered by Clyde Tombaugh in 1930"
solar system - the sun with the celestial bodies that revolve around it in its gravitational field
Translations
Pluto
Pluto
Pluuto
Pluto
PlutoPluton
Pluto
HadPluton
Pluto
Diêm Vương Tinh

Pluto

[ˈpluːtəʊ] N (Astron, Myth) → Plutón m

Pluto

n (Myth) → Pluto m, → Pluton m; (Astron) → Pluto m

Pluto

[ˈpluːtəʊ] n (Astron, Myth) → Plutone m
References in periodicals archive ?
One of the most prominent features on Pluto is Tombaugh Regio, a heart-shaped area that covers a large portion of the southern hemisphere and creeps north.
8 September 2017 - Idaho, US-based web developer Ventive, LLC has agreed to acquire Idaho-based web development/design agency Pluto to further strengthen the company's position in the digital product and custom software development markets, the company said.
With space exploration and colonization becoming a more likely possibility as technology advances, the National Aeronautics Space Administration (NASA) offered a glimpse of what humans of the future might see if they ever make their way to Pluto.
Given what researchers have learned about Pluto since the New Horizons spacecraft flew by in 2015 (SN: 8/8/15, p.
The finding, reported on Wednesday in two research papers published in the journal Nature, adds Pluto to a growing list of worlds in the solar system beyond Earth believed to have underground oceans, some of which potentially could be habitats for life.
Then a recent series of stellar occultations by Pluto, recorded by ground-based astronomers, showed an unexpected trend: even as Pluto edged farther from the Sun, its atmospheric pressure started rising, not falling.
When the New Horizons probe flew past Pluto last July, its images of the dwarf planet's surface revealed deep faults, or fractures in the surface, hundreds of kilometers long, according to the statement from Brown.
The slight haze surrounding Pluto is an effect that has occurred out of harsh winds blowing over Pluto's barren surface.
But this week, in the journal Science, New Horizons scientists have authored the first comprehensive set of papers describing results from last summer's Pluto system flyby.
A team of scientists and engineers on Earth spent nine years guiding the robotic spacecraft to Pluto.
In July, after a nine-year, three-billion-mile journey, New Horizons flew by Pluto at more than 30,000mph (48,280kmph), transmitting back to Earth a treasure trove of stunning images and fascinating data, which continue to arrive.
To get a better look, we sent a small spacecraft named New Horizons to visit Pluto.