pluvial

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plu·vi·al

 (plo͞o′vē-əl)
adj.
1. Of or relating to rain; rainy.
2. Marked or formed by abundant rainfall: pluvial periods; a pluvial lake.
n.
An extended period of abundant rainfall, especially such a period of the Pleistocene Epoch.

[Latin pluviālis, from pluvia, rain; see pluvious.]

pluvial

(ˈpluːvɪəl)
adj
of, characterized by, or due to the action of rain; rainy: pluvial insurance.
n
1. (Geological Science) geology of or relating to rainfall or precipitation
2. (Geological Science) a climate characterized by persistent heavy rainfall, esp one occurring in unglaciated regions during the Pleistocene epoch
[C17: from Latin pluviālis rainy, from pluvia rain]

plu•vi•al

(ˈplu vi əl)

adj.
1. of or pertaining to rain, esp. much rain; rainy.
2. occurring through or formed by the action of rain.
[1650–60; < Latin pluviālis=pluvi(a) rain + -ālis -al1]

plu·vi·al

(plo͞o′vē-əl)
1. Relating to rain; rainy: During the Pleistocene Epoch there were many pluvial periods.
2. Caused by rain: pluvial lakes.
Translations

pluvial

adj (form)Regen-; pluvial erosionErosion fdurch Regen, Regenerosion f
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References in periodicals archive ?
In contrast, extensive tufa research carried out within the Great Basin of southwestern North America documented Quaternary pluvial lake settings and their associated climates (Wright and Frey, 1965; Marker, 1974; Newton and Grossman, 1988; Ford and Pedley, 1996; Waldron and Gaines, 2005; Felton et al.
Orme is well structured with respect to its review of phases in the research back to initial recognition prior to 1870, while also examining current developments such as linkage of pluvial lake history to regional ecology and global climate.
Following the classification of pluvial lake basins by Reeve's (1966), all of the playas are type VI, except for the saline playas which are type IV.
The two lakes are considered remnants of the Paleo-Damascus Pluvial lake of the early Quaternary period (Kaiser et al.