Plymouth


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Related to Plymouth: Plymouth Colony, Plymouth Brethren

Plym·outh

 (plĭm′əth)
1. A city of southwest England on Plymouth Sound, an inlet of the English Channel. A major port, it was the embarkation point for the fleet that fought the Spanish Armada (1588).
2. A town of southeast Massachusetts on Plymouth Bay, an inlet of the Atlantic Ocean, southeast of Boston. Founded in 1620 by Pilgrims, who supposedly set foot on Plymouth Rock when disembarking from the Mayflower, it was the center of Plymouth Colony. The colony was governed under precepts laid down in the Mayflower Compact until 1691, when it was absorbed by the royal colony of Massachusetts.

Plymouth

(ˈplɪməθ)
n
1. (Placename) a port in SW England, in Plymouth unitary authority, SW Devon, on Plymouth Sound (an inlet of the English Channel): Britain's chief port in Elizabethan times; the last port visited by the Pilgrim Fathers in the Mayflower before sailing to America; naval base; university (1992). Pop: 243 795 (2001)
2. (Placename) a unitary authority in SW England, in Devon. Pop: 241 500 (2003 est). Area: 76 sq km (30 sq miles)
3. (Placename) a city in SE Massachusetts, on Plymouth Bay: the first permanent European settlement in New England; founded by the Pilgrim Fathers. Pop: 54 109 (2003 est)
4. (Placename) the former capital of Montserrat, in the Caribbean; largely destroyed by volcanic eruption in 1997

Plym•outh

(ˈplɪm əθ)

n.
1. a seaport in SW Devonshire, in SW England, on the English Channel: the departing point of the Mayflower 1620. 257,900.
2. a city in SE Massachusetts: the oldest town in New England, founded by the Pilgrims 1620. 35,913.
3. a town in SE Minnesota. 52,740.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Plymouth - a town in Massachusetts founded by Pilgrims in 1620Plymouth - a town in Massachusetts founded by Pilgrims in 1620
Bay State, Massachusetts, Old Colony, MA - a state in New England; one of the original 13 colonies
Plymouth Colony - colony formed by the Pilgrims when they arrived at Plymouth Rock in 1620; it was absorbed into the Massachusetts Bay Colony in 1691
Plymouth Rock - a boulder in Plymouth supposed to be where the Pilgrims disembarked from the Mayflower
References in classic literature ?
One of their vessels sails for America, from the port of London, in a fortnight, touching at Plymouth.
Inquiries made at Plymouth proved that they had sailed, forty-eight hours previously, in the BEWLEY CASTLE, East Indiaman, bound direct to Bombay.
Oration at Plymouth, December 22, 1802, in Commemoration of the Landing of the Pilgrims.
So Grandfather talked about the Puritans, {Foot Note: It is more precise to give the name of Pilgrims to those Englishmen who went to Holland and afterward to Plymouth.
According to my observations, we were just off Ram Head, and it was my intention to enter Plymouth Bay and visit Plymouth.
But you, yourself, brought Mrs Harville, her sister, her cousin, and three children, round from Portsmouth to Plymouth.
He was a Plymouth man, I think, the son of a country doctor, and both his elder boys were studying medicine.
They took a lodging in the house where I lived, for a week; at the expiration of which time they were to start for Plymouth.
Then when you arrive at Plymouth or Southampton or whatever port you are bound for, wait on board, and I will meet you at the earliest hour possible.
I added, for I confess I was heartily piqued at the rogue, as I called him, that I had heard a rumour, too, that he had a wife alive at Plymouth, and another in the West Indies, a thing which they all knew was not very uncommon for such kind of gentlemen.
He looked rather distressed as he added, that he had been staying with some friends near Plymouth.
The bigoted and haughty primate, Laud, Archbishop of Canterbury, controlled the religious affairs of the realm, and was consequently invested with powers which might have wrought the utter ruin of the two Puritan colonies, Plymouth and Massachusetts.