pneumocystis pneumonia

(redirected from Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia)
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pneu•mo•cys′tis pneumo′nia

(ˌnu məˈsɪs tɪs, ˌnyu-)

n.
a rare form of pulmonary infection caused by the protozoan Pneumocystis carinii, occurring as an opportunistic disease in persons with impaired immune systems, as persons with AIDS.Abbr.: PCP Also called pneumocys′tis ca•ri′ni•i pneumo′nia (kəˈraɪ niˌaɪ)
[1980–85; pneumocystis < New Latin: genus name; see pneumo-, cyst]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pneumocystis pneumonia - pneumonia occurring in infants or in persons with impaired immune systems (as AIDS victims)
pneumonia - respiratory disease characterized by inflammation of the lung parenchyma (excluding the bronchi) with congestion caused by viruses or bacteria or irritants
References in periodicals archive ?
Describe presentations of Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia, based on a prospective, multicenter observational study in France
The disease may mimic Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia with bilateral ground-glass opacification and reticulonodular infiltrate.
After decades of debate, Pneumoncystis carinii pneumonia (PCP) has recently been reclassified as a fungal infection and renamed Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia.
They all had one or more opportunistic infection, with the most common ones being pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia, cryptococcal meningitis and serious bacterial infections.
and colleagues at the Vanderbilt University School of Medicine in Nashville, TN, found that 32% of HIV positive patients receiving chronic Dapsone therapy, a commonly used antimicrobial agent for the treatment of prophylaxis of pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia (PCP), had elevated methemoglobin blood levels (>2%) and 15% had dangerously high methemoglobin blood levels (>3%) when compared to a control group of HIV positive patients not receiving Dapsone.
The patients all had one or more opportunistic infection, with the most common ones being pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia, cryptococcal meningitis and serious bacterial infections.
Conversely, a decline of AIDS-associated Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia (Pjp) and cryptococcosis has been observed in Western countries since the advent of highly active antiretroviral treatments (5,6).
mucosal candidiasis, cryptococcosis, Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia (PCP), histoplasmosis, etc.
During the initial phase of combination antiretroviral treatment, patients whose immune system responds may develop an inflammatory response to indolent or residual opportunistic infections (such as Mycobacterium avium infection, cytomegalovirus, Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia [PCP], or tuberculosis), which may necessitate further evaluation and treatment.
Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia (PCP) is the leading AIDS-defining illness in the United States and is a serious complication in transplant recipients and other immunocompromised persons.
One month after patient A was arrested, a Singapore-born man (patient B) in a public hospital received a diagnosis of HIV infection (67 CD4 cells/mL) and Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia.
Anecdotal reports from clinicians suggest that incidence of Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia, previously referred to as P.