polar ice cap

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polar ice cap

n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Those supposedly are as much the cause of polar icecap melting, heat waves and bitter colds as factory fumes in the rich world.
Recent warnings by scientists- such as the polar icecap's accelerating meltdown - were heard by children and triggered international grassroot protest.
Shocking report Climate change has been blamed for the melting of the polar icecap and increasing numbers of icebergs breaking off from Baffin Island and Greenland every spring and drifting down the stretch of water along the coast of Newfoundland and Labrador known as'iceberg alley'
Also wonderful was my crisp, detailed view in an 8-inch telescope at 200x--Mars with its polar icecap and dark markings together in one field with Saturn and its rings and brighter moons.
In Arthur and Sherlock, literary historian Michael Sims traces some of Doyle's grand adventures, including expeditions to the polar icecap and Africa, and shows how they became fodder for his early prose.
The colossus was to be built of ice carved out of the polar icecap. Although it was never ultimately constructed, the National Research Council (NRC) of Canada secretly built a scale model of the project in the mountains of western Alberta.
In February, Mark will form part of a team of three Polar explorers from the UK who will attempt to trek across the polar icecap. The men will be embarking on a 470 nautical mile mission from the Canadian coastline to the Geo-graphic North without a re-supply.
The appearance of the Antarctic polar icecap marks the beginning of plankton communities that are still functioning today.
Indeed, if predictions hold true that the polar icecap will completely disappear, then new sea lanes would traverse the North Pole itself.
In recent years, however, the question over who, if anyone, would have control over the regional waters has intensified as scientific consensus has grown that the melting of the polar icecap will open up a Northwest Passage during the summer months.
However, the debate Brooks mentioned stems from archaeological evidence that shows the polar icecap used to reach as far south as New York City and has been receding for thousands of years.
Most sea ice has melted in the Arctic, save the "permanent" polar icecap and ice masses adherent to Greenland, Alaska and the Northern territories, shrinking at an unprecedented rate.