containment

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Related to Policy of containment: Marshall Plan

con·tain·ment

 (kən-tān′mənt)
n.
1. The act or condition of containing.
2. A policy of checking the expansion or influence of a hostile power or ideology, as by the creation of strategic alliances or support of client states in areas of conflict or unrest.
3. A structure or system designed to prevent the accidental release of radioactive materials from a reactor.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

containment

(kənˈteɪnmənt)
n
1. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) the act or condition of containing, esp of restraining the ideological or political power of a hostile country or the operations of a hostile military force
2. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) (from 1947 to the mid-1970s) a principle of US foreign policy that sought to prevent the expansion of Communist power
3. (Nuclear Physics) physics Also called: confinement the process of preventing the plasma in a controlled thermonuclear reactor from reaching the walls of the reaction vessel, usually by confining it within a configuration of magnetic fields. See magnetic bottle
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

con•tain•ment

(kənˈteɪn mənt)

n.
1. the act or condition of containing.
2. an act or policy of restricting the territorial growth or ideological influence of a hostile power, esp. a Communist power.
3. an enclosure surrounding a nuclear reactor designed to prevent the accidental release of radioactive material.
[1645–55]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.containment - a policy of creating strategic alliances in order to check the expansion of a hostile power or ideology or to force it to negotiate peacefully; "containment of communist expansion was a central principle of United States' foreign policy from 1947 to the 1975"
policy - a plan of action adopted by an individual or social group; "it was a policy of retribution"; "a politician keeps changing his policies"
2.containment - (physics) a system designed to prevent the accidental release of radioactive material from a reactor
system - instrumentality that combines interrelated interacting artifacts designed to work as a coherent entity; "he bought a new stereo system"; "the system consists of a motor and a small computer"
natural philosophy, physics - the science of matter and energy and their interactions; "his favorite subject was physics"
3.containment - the act of containing; keeping something from spreading; "the containment of the AIDS epidemic"; "the containment of the rebellion"
restraint - the act of controlling by restraining someone or something; "the unlawful restraint of trade"
ring containment - a strategy of defense in cases of bioterrorism; vaccination only of people exposed and others who are in contact with them; "ring containment is a proven method of halting a smallpox epidemic"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

containment

[kənˈteɪnmənt] N (Pol) → contención f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

containment

[kənˈteɪnmənt] n
(POLITICS) (= policy) → endiguement m
(= control) [fire, disease] → maîtrise f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

containment

n (Mil) → In-Schach-Halten nt; (of attack)Abwehr f; their efforts at containment (of the rebels)ihre Bemühungen, die Rebellen in Schach zu halten
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

containment

[kənˈteɪnmənt] ncontenimento
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
In response to those who, even then, wanted a policy of containment rather than engagement, I pointed out: "Only China can contain China."
Kennan's "The Sources of Soviet Conduct" brilliantly examined the goals of Soviet policy and explained the need for a policy of containment. In 1979, Jeane Kirkpatrick's "Dictatorships and Double Standards" criticized the flawed human rights policies of the Carter administration, demonstrated the important distinctions between authoritarian and totalitarian regimes, and laid the basis for the "Reagan Doctrine" of the 1980s.
``The truth is the policy of containment has not worked.
Why should the United States and its allies abandon a policy of containment that has kept Iraq from threatening its neighbors since the Gulf War?
They regard a policy of containment, rather than confrontation, as the most practical option.
Other American analysts favor a policy of containment. But that, writes Lieberthal, would only divide Asia, strengthen China's nationalists and militarists, and reduce the region's prosperity.
As the first-half wore on, the Clarets were forced into a lengthy policy of containment, Chelsea dominating possession and asking all the questions, with Giroud and Alvaro Morata, starting together for the first time, linking up well.
Riedel said it is time to move to a policy of containment, which would mean a more hostile relationship, but stressed that it should be a focused hostility, aimed not at hurting Pakistan's people but at holding its army and intelligence branches accountable.
Others deemed this to be too dangerous in an era defined by nuclear weapons, and the US opted instead for a policy of containment, working to limit the reach of Soviet power and influence.
Kennan, a top State Department planner who had explained the policy of containment in an article in Foreign Affairs in 1947.
It was a policy of containment and deterrence that proved successful in the nuclear age.
Once ahead, Emley adopted a policy of containment and this proved successful in the conditions - although the introduction of Alan Cowley gave Runcorn late hope after Gary Lunt had hit wide for the Linnets from a long McMillan clearance.