Polonist

Polonist

a specialist in Polish language, literature, and culture.
See also: Language
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The subject of the contract are publishing services consisting in the preparation of a graphic design, editorial office (including substantive correction, preparation of a table of contents and a list of abbreviations), polonist correction, composition, printing and distribution in accordance with the distribution list, publications from the aplikanta library series.
In the feminist Polonist texts however, one can hardly find traces of this exchange.
At the same time, feminist Polonists subordinate to the narrative of catching up with global (academic) progress as they perceive feminist thought to be 'lagging behind' in Poland.
The following examples concentrate mainly on the Polonists Grazyna Borkowska, Krystyna Ktosinska and Ewa Kraskowska, who published, respectively, in 1996 and 1999 influential monographs on women's literature.
By focusing on literature from before World War II, contemporary feminist Polonists omitted the tackling of socialist literary production.
By tracing these historical relations, today's feminist Polonists not only challenge the notion of feminism as something new and alien; they also replenish the historiography about these times.
"This competition is a good platform that brings together Ukrainian students from Polonists. They have the opportunity to exchange ideas, to deepen their knowledge of Polish, to improve their professional skills ", - said the rector of the PNU them.
Seiler argues that this recent transformation leads to the establishment of a feminism of difference which feminist Polonists perceive to be 'lagging behind' in Poland and which in turn causes a conceptual fuzziness.
The run-of-the-mill Polonists have been afraid to face that other dimension of humanity, and they are adamantly opposed to admitting that the learned and great poet Adam Mickiewicz looked at things differently.
As for me, I've been teaching Pushkin in winter quarter 2007--and every colleague I meet in the elevator on my way to class (Russianists, Germanists, Polonists...) has expressed envy.
Kuznica grew out of circle of people with whom Kott was on familiar terms, namely the pre-war Circle of Polonists, a large and influential democratic-Catholic-leftist group at Warsaw university, one of the few student organizations to which Jews were admitted.
Yet Jagiellonian University and University of Warsaw teem with able Polonists (some of whom contributed to the volume (Nie)obecnosc reviewed in this issue of SR) whose professional credentials compare favorably to some of the current Harvard professors in Slavic languages and literatures.