polyene

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Related to Polyenes: Azoles

pol·y·ene

 (pŏl′ē-ēn′)
n.
An organic compound containing two or more carbon-carbon double bonds.

polyene

(ˈpɒlɪˌiːn)
n
(Elements & Compounds) a chemical compound containing a chain of alternating single and double carbon-carbon bonds
References in periodicals archive ?
Evaluation of Mutant erg6 and hmg1 by Transformation Considering the different level of ergosterol biosynthesis in the third set of isolates, we wanted to determine whether the mutation in erg6 and/or hmg1 genes was responsible for the phenotypes (i.e., sensitivity to polyenes and resistance to azoles).
This absorbance occurs due to [pi] [right arrow] [pi] * electronic transitions in aromatic systems such as phenolic groups, aniline derivatives of benzoic acids, polyenes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (Rodriguez et al., 2016).
Candidemia is the main cause of fungal sepsis, therefore, preferred prophylactic antifungal therapy is commonly done with first generation Azoles such as Fluconazol and Polyenes (Amphotericin B), both with adequate penetration in central nervous system (CNS) and renal parenchyma.
Systemic Antifungal Agents in Invasive Fungal Infections That Act on Fungal Cell Membranes: Polyenes and Azoles
Other applications of the ring-shaped potential can be found in ring-shaped organic molecules like cyclic polyenes and benzene [11,12].
Current antifungal agents are divided into four groups: polyenes, imidazoles, triazoles, and fluorinated pyrimidines [4].
Acyclic polyenes," The Journal of Chemical Physics, vol.
Polyenes and azole compounds are routinely applied chemotherapy to fungal keratitis (12).
The fungal strain is typically multidrug resistant to all major classes of antifungals, almost always to polyenes and azoles, and in many cases to echinocandins (CDC, 2017c).
Many antifungal agents used clinically for treatment of fungal infection, among them most common agents are polyenes and azoles, but with apparent toxicity of these agents to mammalian cell, these drugs are not very effective to cure infections.
As per the existing literatures, antifungal drugs have been classified into three classes of natural products (griseofulvin, polyenes and echinocandins) and four classes of synthetic drugs (azoles, allylamines, phenylmorpholines and flucytosine) having clinical value against mycotic infections.