Polyxena


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Polyxena

(pɒˈlɪksɪnə)
n
(Classical Myth & Legend) Greek myth a daughter of King Priam of Troy, who was sacrificed on the command of Achilles' ghost
References in classic literature ?
The Greeks, after burning the city, sacrifice Polyxena at the tomb of Achilles: Odysseus murders Astyanax; Neoptolemus takes Andromache as his prize, and the remaining spoils are divided.
Here, Hardy's tragedy recovers from the ancients the indictment of such models--Iphigenia slaughtered by Agamemnon, her father, for wind to Troy, and Cassandra raped by him, or Hecuba's daughter, Polyxena, sacrificed by the Greek host so that Achilles's ghost can have her.
Ex foeminis Pasiphae, Ariadne, Berenice, Hermione, Briseis, Penelobe, Deidamira, Ersilia uxor Rouli, Ero, Virginia, Anaxarete, Antigone, Arachne, Arethusa, Arsinoe, Polyxena, Pelagia, Lycaste, Iocasta, Hecuba, Cassandra, Hesperie, Cleopatra, Coelia, Ilia, Sybillae, Vestales.
The central figure of the play, which largely takes the form of a lamentation, is Hecuba, widow of the slain Trojan king Priam and mother of Paris, Hector, Cassandra, and Polyxena (along with many others).
The love for Polyxena reveals more than Achilles wants to have known about himself; and surely it complicates our understanding of his relationship with Patroclus, who in fact has heard the exchange with Ulysses and rightly says that the Greek warriors think that "your great love to me restrains you thus" (221).
And we witness the shocking moment when the sacrifice of her daughter Polyxena turns into a long painful death as the executor hacks away at her body.
9-magnitude star in Virgo near Spica will be occulted by the asteroid 595 Polyxena, magnitude 12.
In Trojan Women, we witness the pathos of the mother who loses her daughters one by one, Cassandra to become concubine to Agamemnon, Polyxena to be sacrificed at Achilles's tomb, and who is left alone at the end of the play with the body of her murdered grandchild.
De meme la hongroise Polyxena Wesselenyi ou la polonaise Maria Wirtemberska, dans leurs recits de voyage, optent pour une ecriture qui, selon les standards etablis par les hommes, est immediatement reperable comme feminine (importance accordee aux sentiments et problemes politiques systematiquement passes sous silence).
In this case, as Polyxena tears her garments to the navel and invites her executioner to strike her breast or her neck (Hec.
Bremmer, "Myth and Ritual in Greek Human Sacrifice: Lykaon, Polyxena and the Case of the Rhodian Criminal," in The Strange World of Human Sacrifice, ed.
For instance, Helen tells the stories of Cassandra, Briseis, Polyxena, and Iphigenia to explain women's sufferings.