Polyxena


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Polyxena

(pɒˈlɪksɪnə)
n
(Classical Myth & Legend) Greek myth a daughter of King Priam of Troy, who was sacrificed on the command of Achilles' ghost
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in classic literature ?
The Greeks, after burning the city, sacrifice Polyxena at the tomb of Achilles: Odysseus murders Astyanax; Neoptolemus takes Andromache as his prize, and the remaining spoils are divided.
Among their topics are making meaning of myth: the interpretation of mythological imagery in the Polyxena Sarcophagus and the Kizilbel Tomb and the history of Achaemenid Asia Minor, from Mezntie to Mezentius: the stratigraphy of a myth in Etruria and Rome, distributive narrative: a very short history of juxtaposing myths on Pompeian walls, Gilgamesh and Homer: the missing link, and the transformations of Achilles on late Roman mosaics in the east.
[Eighteenth century] Eberlin, Johann Ernst Sigismundus 1753 Rousseau, Jean-Jacques Pygmalion 1762/1770 Asplmayr, Franz Pygmalion 1772 Schweitzer, Anton Pygmalion 1772 Seckendorff, Carl Siegmund von Proserpina 1775 Benda, Jiri (Geotg) Ariadne auf Naxos 1775 Medea 1775 Philon et Theone 1779 (revised asAlmansor und Nadine) Pygmalion 1779 Wolf, Ernst Wilhelm Polyxena 1776 Rust, Friedrich Wilhelm Colma's Klage 1777 Inkle und Yariko 1777 Reichardt, Johann Friedrich Cephalus und Procris 1777 Zimmermann, Anton Die Wilden 1777 Zelmor und Ermide 1780 Andromeda und Perseus 1781 Winter, Peter Cora und Alonzo 1778 Leonardo und Blandine 1779 Reinhold und Armida 1780 Medea und Jason 1789 Mozart, Wolfgang A.
Traxerat Aeacides spumantibus Hectora bigis, Hostili fuerat jugulata Polyxena busto, Rex Thracum insontis Polydori sanguine terram Polluerat, dederat letho Pyrrhusque Polytem, Deiphobum Atrides, Paridem Telamonius heros.
Here, Hardy's tragedy recovers from the ancients the indictment of such models--Iphigenia slaughtered by Agamemnon, her father, for wind to Troy, and Cassandra raped by him, or Hecuba's daughter, Polyxena, sacrificed by the Greek host so that Achilles's ghost can have her.
(Ex foeminis Pasiphae, Ariadne, Berenice, Hermione, Briseis, Penelobe, Deidamira, Ersilia uxor Rouli, Ero, Virginia, Anaxarete, Antigone, Arachne, Arethusa, Arsinoe, Polyxena, Pelagia, Lycaste, Iocasta, Hecuba, Cassandra, Hesperie, Cleopatra, Coelia, Ilia, Sybillae, Vestales.
The central figure of the play, which largely takes the form of a lamentation, is Hecuba, widow of the slain Trojan king Priam and mother of Paris, Hector, Cassandra, and Polyxena (along with many others).
The love for Polyxena reveals more than Achilles wants to have known about himself; and surely it complicates our understanding of his relationship with Patroclus, who in fact has heard the exchange with Ulysses and rightly says that the Greek warriors think that "your great love to me restrains you thus" (221).
And we witness the shocking moment when the sacrifice of her daughter Polyxena turns into a long painful death as the executor hacks away at her body.
On the night of April 14-15, an 8.9-magnitude star in Virgo near Spica will be occulted by the asteroid 595 Polyxena, magnitude 12.3, along a path from Newfoundland and Maine through southern Ontario, Michigan, and Nebraska to northern California.
While h is often observed that Marlowe has Aeneas fail to save three women (Creusa, Cassandra, and Polyxena) in a row--thus building on the martial inadequacy of Virgil's Aeneas, who stands "unmanned" (44) after witnessing the murder of the patriarch Priam--Marlowe significantly deletes the extremely moving encounter between Aeneas and the ghost of Creusa in Virgil.