poor law

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poor law

n.
A law or system of laws providing for public relief and support of the poor.

poor law

n
(Historical Terms) English history a law providing for the relief or support of the poor from public, esp parish, funds

poor′ law`


n.
a law or system of laws providing for the relief or support of the poor at public expense.
[1745–55]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.poor law - a law providing support for the poorpoor law - a law providing support for the poor
law - legal document setting forth rules governing a particular kind of activity; "there is a law against kidnapping"
law, jurisprudence - the collection of rules imposed by authority; "civilization presupposes respect for the law"; "the great problem for jurisprudence to allow freedom while enforcing order"
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References in classic literature ?
I can imagine the glee of our Poor Law Commissioners at the notion of these seats having arms and backs; but small spines being of older date than their occupation of the Board-room at Somerset House, I thought even this provision very merciful and kind.
Most illogical, inconsequential, and light- headed, this; but travellers in the valley of the shadow of death are apt to be light-headed; and worn-out old people of low estate have a trick of reasoning as indifferently as they live, and doubtless would appreciate our Poor Law more philosophically on an income of ten thousand a year.
The Treadmill and the Poor Law are in full vigour, then?
on his Proposed Bill for the Amendment of the Poor Laws (London, 1807) 2nd.
How and why the intellectual underpinnings of the poor laws changed over a period of two-hundred and fifty years, that is, their cultural meaning is its key interest.
For example, when the Poor Laws were revised in the 1840s, bureaucratic motives were not primarily "humanitarian" or "liberal.
The resulting acts, known generally as the Poor Laws, became a national system of poor relief and created, according to Jonathan Healey, the first welfare state.
Despite the existence of a voluminous literature on various aspects of workhouse life and the operations of the Old and New Poor Laws, historians have tended to neglect the subject of workhouse medicine or consigned it to an afterthought in their broader studies.
However, during the time of the Rebecca Riots and subsequent destruction of Carmarthen Workhouse, a journalist from The Times reported "universal feelings of detestation" for the poor laws in Wales.
Normally, about 10% of the inhabitants in a parish received some form of aid through the Poor Laws.
For scholars of poor laws in these two communities, the book will be quite useful as Williams really does go by the numbers, providing lots of charts and graphs of who was given what when.
This collection of fourteen scholarly articles on poverty in Ireland during the era of the Poor Laws, examines the development of the workhouse system of poverty relief and the effects of this system, and its descendants, through the years of the Great Famine and into the twentieth century.