popper

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pop·per

 (pŏp′ər)
n.
1. One that pops.
2. A container or pan for making popcorn.
3. Slang An ampoule of amyl nitrite or butyl nitrite, used illicitly to induce euphoria and enhance sexual stimulation.

popper

(ˈpɒpə)
n
1. a person or thing that pops
2. (Knitting & Sewing) Brit an informal name for press stud
3. (Cookery) chiefly US and Canadian a container for cooking popcorn in
4. (Recreational Drugs) slang an amyl nitrite capsule, which is crushed and its contents inhaled by drug users as a stimulant

Popper

(ˈpɒpə)
n
(Biography) Sir Karl. 1902–94, British philosopher, born in Vienna. In The Logic of Scientific Discovery (1934), he proposes that knowledge cannot be absolutely confirmed, but rather that science progresses by the experimental refutation of the current theory and its consequent replacement by a new theory, equally provisional but covering more of the known data. The Open Society and its Enemies (1945) is a critique of dogmatic political philosophies, such as Marxism. Other works are The Poverty of Historicism (1957), Conjectures and Refutations (1963), and Objective Knowledge (1972)
Popperian n, adj

pop•per

(ˈpɒp ər)

n.
1. a person or thing that pops.
2. a covered pan used for popping corn.
3. a vial of amyl or butyl nitrite abused as a vasodilator for the effect of exhilaration.
[1740–50]

Pop•per

(ˈpɒp ər)

n. Sir Karl (Rai•mund) (ˈreɪ mənd)
1902–94, British philosopher, born in Austria.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Popper - British philosopher (born in Austria) who argued that scientific theories can never be proved to be true, but are tested by attempts to falsify them (1902-1994)
philosopher - a specialist in philosophy
2.popper - a container of stimulant drug (amyl nitrate or butyl nitrite)
excitant, stimulant drug, stimulant - a drug that temporarily quickens some vital process
3.popper - a container for cooking popcorn
cooker - a utensil for cooking
Translations
poppers

popper

[ˈpɒpəʳ] N
1. (Brit) (= press-stud) → corchete m
2. (Drugs) cápsula de nitrito amílico

popper

[ˈpɒpər] n (British)bouton-pression m

popper

n (Brit inf: = press-stud) → Druckknopf m

popper

[ˈpɒpəʳ] n (Brit) → (bottone m) automatico

popper

n. pop. nombre atribuído a algunas drogas adictivas.
References in periodicals archive ?
I am not sure if Mueller read or studied Popper's method of scientific enquiry but certainly his method and conclusion bear a strong Popperian sentiment.
The author points out that these have taken the form of attempts to define science in terms of Popperian falsifiability or methodological naturalism.
A Popperian Approach to Research in Clinical Psychiatry," Nordic Journal of Psychiatry 61(46S): 4-34.
While some can argue that the purpose of the loop is more a model of learning and adaptation than a model for decision-making (Osinga, 2005), it is reasonable to assert that this is a distinction without a difference within Popperian conjectures.
The most notable example involved her confusion of ground level ozone with chlorofluorocarbons and smog, although it is also evident in her shallow account of scientific rationality based on an overly simplistic account of Popperian falsifiability and her sloppy use of ambiguous examples when summarizing Daniel Kahneman's Thinking, Fast and Slow.
The feminist objectivity, in the Popperian sense of scientific rationality, is an ongoing critical and rational engagement with the human conditions for better visions, better accounts of the world which have no escape from human agency and responsibility.
Today knowledge and science are experienced differently than before and this necessitates that knowledge in general and science in particular must be set in a historical perspective that would thoroughly elaborate their historicity despite the Popperian enmity against such an attempt (Popper 1957, and especially 1945, 200-211).
Karl Popper's philosophy of science seems to have snuck into Daubert, (215) for example, in part for no better reason than that a then-recently-published law review article presenting a (quasi-) Popperian conception of science caught Justice Blackmun's attention; (216) and Daubert has not only taken root in a majority of states in the United States, (217) but has extended its influence to other jurisdictions from Canada (218) to Colombia.
Karlson sets out three strategies of reform: the Popperian, the Kuhnian, and the Machiavellian.
hard-wired, incapable of novel variations of behaviour); "Skinnerian" (for Behaviourist B.F.: capable of behaviours modified by reinforcement); "Popperian" (for philosopher Karl: capable of storing and acting upon information from the world but without understanding); "Gregorian" (for psychologist Richard Gregory: equipped with "thinking tools" and higher-order mental searches).