Porcelain ware


Related to Porcelain ware: chinaware

Porcelain ware

Some utensils such as teapots were made of porcelain, but such pots would, of course, crack if heated on the stove. (If an enamelware utensil was overheated, as could happen if a Teakettle boiled dry, the enamel coating would also crack and flake off.) Usually, a “porcelain” utensil really meant a utensil of enamelware.
References in periodicals archive ?
The porcelain ware designed by Hans and Marlene also caught (he mood, with swirling, curling bone china creations blooming like lavaeruptions.
In addition to producing unique ceramics, he designed a series of utilitarian porcelain ware.
The company developed the product, called ''Eco Filter,'' by using the region's traditional Hasamiyaki porcelain ware manufacturing technology.
It often appears the designers have used up all their creativity,and cash,on the main area and opt for tiles and porcelain ware that would be better suited to a working men's club when it comes to the loos.
THE ZISHA TEAPOT IS THE RENOWNED PORCELAIN WARE PRODUCED IN YIXING CITY, JIANGSU PROVINCE, China.
Yoshikawa's oeuvre includes stone and porcelain ware with the employment of blue-white glazes (seihakuji), also seen in the ceramic ware of artists Tukami Sueharu and Yagi Akira, although, in Yoshikawa's work, the lusciousness of the glazes extenuate the formal quality of the piece, which is far more important than its function.
The company produces its coffee cups using the same standard as its other porcelain ware.
Mirrors in gilt frames featured strongly, as did lacquerwork screens, porcelain ware and fans from the Orient.
For the past few years, Lee, also known by his Chinese name Li Jianshen, has been exploring the juxtaposition of tradition and contemporary ceramics in his series of Neo-Imperial porcelain ware.
The idea owes its origins to a glittering exhibition of coffee-related porcelain ware due to open in the spring of 1991.
It occurs to me that the monochrome period of white porcelain ware that is representative of the Choson period, corresponds with Minimalism in modern art.
OVER THE PAST DECADE, Huang Huanyi has explored the application of blue patterns from Chinese traditional porcelain ware on to urban public art.