groundwater

(redirected from Pore water)
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Related to Pore water: Pore water pressure

ground·wa·ter

also ground water  (ground′wô′tər, -wŏt′ər)
n.
Water beneath the earth's surface, often between saturated soil and rock, that supplies wells and springs.

groundwater

(ˈɡraʊndˌwɔːtə)
n
(Physical Geography) underground water that has come mainly from the seepage of surface water and is held in pervious rocks

ground′wa`ter

or ground′ wa`ter,


n.
the water beneath the surface of the ground, the source of spring and well water.
[1885–90]

ground·wa·ter

(ground′wô′tər)
Water that flows or collects beneath the Earth's surface. Groundwater originates from rain and from melting snow and ice. It sinks into the ground, filling the small empty spaces in soil, sediment, and porous rocks. Aquifers, springs, and wells are supplied by the flow of groundwater.
Translations

groundwater

[ˈgraʊndwɔːtəʳ] Nagua f subterránea, aguas fpl superficiales

groundwater

[ˈgraʊndwɔːtər] nnappe f phréatique
References in periodicals archive ?
In engineering, after the construction of a breakwater on seabed, the weight of breakwater is initially transferred to the pore water in seabed foundation, resulting in the generation of excess pore pressure and pressure gradient (Fig.
Although experimental studies allow the direct measurement of variables involved in the infiltration process (e.g., saturation, positive pore water pressure, and suction) which can be related to the decrease of soil shear strength and slope failure, experimental tests have the disadvantage of being costly and time consuming.
The acute toxicity assays were performed using Ceriodaphnia silvestrii Daday, 1902 and Chironomus xanthus Rempel, 1939 for water samples (water column and sediment pore water) and bulk sediment samples, respectively, before and after the application of nitrate, in an incubation period of 135 days.
"Everything may look clean but, if you look under the rugs, that's where you find most of the dirt." The potential impacts of pore water contamination extend far beyond the river bottom, he explains, because "this is where the biological food chain begins, so any bioaccumulation of toxins will start here."
[17] studied the effect of pore water and adsorbed moisture on the dielectric properties of Green River oil shale, they noted a regular decrease in the relative dielectric constant [epsilon]' and dielectric loss [epsilon]" with decreasing amount of adsorbed moisture and pore water.
"The central thing is how pore water pressure affects soil strength and how, in turn, evapotranspiration affects pore water pressure,' says Glendinning.
This causes the leak of pore water, and a loss of volume.
Depth to water level (DWL) from the ground surface between tussocks was measured (30 October 2007, 30 May and 30 July 2008), and the pore water samples were taken (1 November 2007, 1 June 2008) from piezometers (PVC tubes with the inner diameter of 22 mm, perforated by 10 cm and inserted into the surface to a depth of 50 cm) close to each releve.
To describe the state of pore water in concrete, one has to distinguish between three different states: (i) non-saturated concrete, (ii) saturated concrete and (iii) transition from non-saturated to saturated concrete.
The most likely origin for the basal low-friction zone is in a layer of clay sediment, overpressured by pore water.
The thrust ridge is composed of lake sediments that were probably pushed up along a hinge-line created by the rotational collapse of an intact slab of limestone and/or pore water pressure created by the collapse.
The device measures pore water conducity (ECp)--the EC of the water that is available to the plant.