porphyry

(redirected from Porphyrian)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

por·phy·ry

 (pôr′fə-rē)
n. pl. por·phy·ries
1. Any of various varieties of reddish-purple rock, often containing light-colored crystals, used as a decorative stone.
2. Geology Rock containing relatively large conspicuous crystals, especially of feldspar, in a fine-grained igneous matrix.

[Middle English porphiri, porfurie, purplish-red porphyry, from Old French porfire, from Italian porfiro, from Medieval Latin porphyrium, from Latin porphyrītēs, from Greek porphurītēs, from porphurā, mollusk yielding Tyrian purple, Tyrian purple garment; see purple.]

porphyry

(ˈpɔːfɪrɪ)
n, pl -ries
1. (Geological Science) any igneous rock with large crystals embedded in a finer groundmass of minerals
2. (Geological Science) obsolete a reddish-purple rock consisting of large crystals of feldspar in a finer groundmass of feldspar, hornblende, etc
[C14 porfurie, from Late Latin porphyrītēs, from Greek porphuritēs (lithos) purple (stone), from porphuros purple]

Porphyry

(ˈpɔːfɪrɪ)
n
(Biography) original name Malchus. 232–305 ad, Greek Neo-Platonist philosopher, born in Syria; disciple and biographer of Plotinus

por•phy•ry

(ˈpɔr fə ri)

n., pl. -ries.
1. a very hard rock, anciently quarried in Egypt, having a dark, purplish red groundmass containing small crystals of feldspar.
2. any igneous rock containing coarse crystals, as phenocrysts, in a finer-grained groundmass.
[1350–1400; Middle English porfurie, porfirie < Medieval Latin porphyreum, alter. of Latin porphyrītēs < Greek porphyritēs (líthos) porphyritic (i.e., purplish) stone =pórphyr(os) purple + -ītēs; see -ite1]
por`phy•rit′ic (-ˈrɪt ɪk) adj.

por·phy·ry

(pôr′fə-rē)
A fine-grained igneous rock containing some relatively large crystals, especially of feldspar.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.porphyry - any igneous rock with crystals embedded in a finer groundmass of mineralsporphyry - any igneous rock with crystals embedded in a finer groundmass of minerals
groundmass - (geology) the matrix of fine-grained crystalline material in which larger crystals are embedded
igneous rock - rock formed by the solidification of molten magma
Translations

porphyry

[ˈpɔːfɪrɪ] Npórfido m

porphyry

nPorphyr m
References in periodicals archive ?
Gianni Vattimo prepares II pensiero debole (1983; Weak Thought) that included Eco's article on the Porphyrian tree, labyrinths, and rhizome.
Keywords: Category, subcategory, Porphyrian Tree, Minimal and Maximal Division, categorial property.
Tertullian's implication that a senatus consultum outlawed Christianity is confirmed by the Acts of Apollonius, a senator who died as a martyr under Commodus (55), and above all by a Porphyrian passage.
Among his topics are the integration of humanism in the educational program of the Jesuits, Jesuits between religion and science, the Jesuits and the Janus-faced history of natural sciences, Rodrigo de Arriaga on immortality as a response to Platonism, and the Porphyrian Tree in philosophy of the 17th and 18th centuries.
Evidently, Augustine read a few Plotinian and Porphyrian treatises, but those he had read he knew well.
This book introduces the quasi Porphyrian trees that serve to structure much of the information Fludd presents (this compendious method of presentation was employed earlier by Artusi in his summary of Zarlino's work).
(39) Casalboni 2001, 48--55; Motti 2004, 14--24; Tornielli 2005, 61--63 on the tale of the Widow of Ephesus as a parody of resurrection and the connection with the Nazareth Edict; 84--84 on the Porphyrian fragment referring to Jesus' apparitions after his resurrection and the s.c.
(17-21) However, despite the fact that the Platonic idea of automatic reincarnation or the Pythagorean (or Porphyrian or Celtic/bardic) conception transmigration of souls offers solace to those individuals raised with a univalent belief in either salvation or damnation, to accept this doctrine without modification would be a mockery of Yeats's decades of study: first in the Theosophical Society, then as a member of the Theosophical Society's Esoteric Section, then his 32 year tenure as an initiate in the Golden Dawn, and finally the years of work he put in on A Vision.
No small part of Cooper's commentary is devoted to the question of how Victorinus read Paul through Neoplatonic (that is, Plotinian or Porphyrian) eyes, and his comments form a useful introduction to the somewhat scattered views of others, especially Hadot, all properly acknowledged.
Fragments of more than seventy-five works (including those extant) have recently been gathered by Andrew Smith,(4) who has thus made good a promise made twenty years ago to fill this glaring gap in Porphyrian scholarship.(5) We now possess in published form virtually all that remains of Porphyry's vast output.(6) The purpose of the present article is to add to this nearly complete oeuvre a further, perhaps final, text, the manuscript of which has now been rediscovered for the first time since it was used in 1691 by Richard Bentley.
He also cogently refutes the "Porphyrian hypothesis." The appearance of Porphyry, but not Plotinus, in the work's title, the presence of a series of "headings" at its beginning summarizing a portion of the Enneads only partially reproduced in the text itself, and a number of apparently "Porphyrian" doctrines in the non-Plotinian portions of the text, have all been linked by scholars in various ways with Porphyry's own (rather ambiguously worded) claim to have composed both "headings" and "commentaries" on Plotinus' essays, neither of which appear in the extant Greek text of the Enneads.
We will focus on the analysis of the theory of [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII.], following the Porphyrian reading of the Plotinian argument of the causal priority of the One with regard to the multiple (111, 9 [13] 4, 1-9; VI 4 [22] 3), as applied to God, Intellect and Soul.