PhG

(redirected from Portal hypertensive gastropathy)
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PhG

abbr.
Graduate in Pharmacy
References in periodicals archive ?
Gastroduodenal ulcer and erosions are related to portal hypertensive gastropathy and recent alcohol intake in cirrhotic patients.
Of the 45 patients which had negative EGD exam for any esophageal varices (EV), portal hypertensive gastropathy (PHG), or gastric varices (GV), 31 patients (69%) had features of portal hypertension enteropathy in their VCE.
The present study identified a very high prevalence (> 90%) of esophageal varices and portal hypertensive gastropathy. Previous studies have estimated the prevalence of esophageal varices at the time of diagnosis of liver cirrhosis as about 35% in patients with compensated cirrhosis and 60% in patients with decompensated cirrhosis [1], while portal hypertensive gastropathy is reportedly seen in 11-80% of cirrhotic patients [1, 16-18].
Portal hypertensive gastropathy: A systematic review of the pathophysiology, clinical presentation, natural history and therapy.
[31] found that PSE induced a 11% reduction in gastric mucosal hemoglobin content (P < 0.01) when assessed byreflectance spectrophotometry, while portal hypertensive gastropathy in PSE group was significantly improved versus control.
In addition, studies have shown that the degree of portal hypertensive gastropathy (PHG) has also shown a worsening trend after the introduction of therapeutic endoscopic interventions for oesophageal varices.18
When viral cirrhosis is the etiology of the liver failure, patients have up to a 25% chance of developing severe portal hypertensive gastropathy and a nearly 90% chance of developing any degree of esophageal varices.
Three patients had portal hypertensive gastropathy along with esophageal varices.
Coverage includes the use of anticoagulants and antiplatelet agents, the use of antibiotics, hemostatic devices, and therapies for peptic ulcer bleeding, esophageal varices, portal hypertensive gastropathy, removal of foreign bodies, benign and malignant esophageal strictures, esophageal obstructions, Barrett's esophagus, cancer, leaks, bleeding, polyps, and other problems.
Other sources of bleeding, such as gastric and duodenal ulcers, gastric varices, erosive gastritis or portal hypertensive gastropathy, were included in the definition of rebleeding.
Portal hypertensive gastropathy (PHG) is a gastric mucosal anomaly commonly found in patients with portal hypertension [1].