Portland stone


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Port´land stone´


1.A yellowish-white calcareous freestone from the Isle of Portland in England, much used in building.
Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary, published 1913 by G. & C. Merriam Co.
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Her eyes and hair were hazel-nut color; and her teeth, the upper row of which she displayed freely, were like fine Portland stone, and sloped outward enough to have spoilt her mouth, had they not been supported by a rich under lip, and a finely curved, impudent chin.
The facade has a gentle curve of vertical prisms of glass above a sweeping street canopy, the whole framed in Portland stone. It is a wonderful celebration of 1950s style so well expressed at the time by the Festival of Britain.
In a previous statement, Network Rail said work to the grade two listed station included specialist cleaning of the Portland stone facade and work to increase the capacity of the roof drainage outlets to make it more weatherproof.
In a previous statement, Network Rail said renovations to the Grade II listed station included specialist cleaning of the Portland stone facade and work to increase the roof drainage outlets' capacity to make it more weather-proof.
In old Elton Square on granite and portland stone, A bronzed St George, battles the dragon on his own.
It is made of reinforced concrete and clad in Portland stone and was built by John Gray who once lived at Coombe Abbey.
Sitting on a plinth of Portland Stone, the bust is inscribed with two quotes: "The greatest comedian of our lifetime - kissed with genius," which was said by Michael Billington, of The Guardian.
We are currently waiting for the professional stone mason that installed the plinth to advise us of the best way to remove the graffiti without damaging the beautiful Portland stone."
Above the striking portico of classical columns rises an unmistakably Modernist-style central panel of windows and vertical fins in Portland stone, framed by a set-back surround of stone with inset windows.
The octagonal hall with domed roof (pictured) was constructed from Portland Stone and funded by public donations.
THE Hall of Memory opened in 1925 after three years' work to commemorate 12,320 lives lost during the First World War, the octagonal hall with domed roof was constructed from Portland Stone and funded by public donations.

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