portolan

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portolan

(ˈpɔːtəˌlæn)
n
(Nautical Terms) nautical a book of sailing charts with notations on coasts, harbours, etc
References in periodicals archive ?
This discusses much more than just the Queen Mary Atlas, it covers map-making in Europe since medieval times, the development of the portolan chart, the golden age of Portugal's cartography 1500-1600 and the chart-making output of the Homem family.
He examines maps, showing the role that Arabic and Turkish played in the development of navigational terms and the portolan chart; he also shows the familiarity that the greatest Ottoman cartographer, Piri Reis, had with Greek and Italian geographical material.
From the earliest Mediterranean sailor's Portolan chart to modern-day tourist guides, maps have accompanied humans in their endeavours and travels for thousands of years.
The origin of the portolan chart, on the other hand, is a bit of an enigma.
He even suggests that it was possibly Sir Francis Drake who translated PRAIA that he had seen on a Portuguese map on his circumnavigation (1577-1580), since the earliest map the author had found with BEACH on it was a portolan chart by the Majorcan cartographer Joan Martines of 1587, subsequent to Drake's voyage!
Before the development of portolan charts in the 14th century; that defined routes around the Mediterranean, most maps were intended as summaries of knowledge and not as an actual spatial record.
The second symposium was the First International Workshop on the Origin and Evolution of Portolan Charts (http://ciuhct.org/Events/portmeeting/Index.htm) held 6-7 June 2016 at the Navy Museum in Lisbon, Portugal, organised by the Interuniversity Centre for the History of Science and Technology (http://ciuhct.org/en).
The Enigma of the Origin of Portolan Charts: A Geodetic Analysis of the Hypothesis of a Medieval Origin
Portolan charts were the fruits of the first systematic marine surveys.
Blake relates the development of the sea chart from the days when manuscripts were drawn on sheep skins, such as the portolan charts that survived from the thirteenth century, through the maritime ascendancy of the Spanish and Portuguese, then the Dutch, French, and British through the eighteenth century, when the discovery and charting of the coasts and the oceans of the globe had become a strategic naval and commercial requirement, to the modern Admiralty charts of today.
As a result, the landmass was located in physical relationship to other parts of the known world; its boundaries were defined and located within the compass lines of portolan charts and the lines of longitude and latitude of maps.
In the last part, 'The Mediterranean Road,' Paul Kunitzsch presents the tools of premodern Arabic-Islamic astronomers such as three-dimensional celestial globes and the astrolabe, and finally Sonja Brentjes states that elements in fourteenth-century Catalan portolan charts are similar to the late Ilkhanid school.