Portuguese Timor


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Portuguese Timor

n
(Placename) a former name for East Timor
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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At Maubara, near the central border on the north coast of Timor-Leste (the former Portuguese Timor), stands an unpretentious stone fort.
From the perspective of Dili, the king was a useful figure on account of his influence in the eastern part of Portuguese Timor, echoing the wider importance of the Luca kingship hinted at in the 1668 source and in modern tradition.
In 1975, Indonesian forces occupied Portuguese Timor in the East Indies, while her last remaining colony, the island of Macao, was handed over to Communist China in 1999.
Drawing on private correspondence as well as official telegrams and dispatches, author Tarling, a fellow of the New Zealand Asia Institute, analyzes Britain's impact on Portuguese Timor. The first half of the book is devoted to the WWII period, with background on the general impact of the war on the region and details on Japanese occupation, wartime negotiations, and the re-establishment of Portuguese rule.
While Japan has supported the nation-building of East Timor, it has not yet clarified how to take responsibility for the Japanese military's seizure of Portuguese Timor and its human rights infringements and how to redress victims, the group noted.
We can posit as our first hypothesis that the ideas of Mohammad Yamin, an Indonesian nationalist historian who stood for the extension of sovereignty of the new Republic over Portuguese Timor would have conquered the ear of a few followers in the inner circle around President Sukarno, in the second half of the 1950s.
Former capital of Portuguese Timor and of Indonesia's twenty-seventh province, post-independence Dili is a town riven by segregation.
Furthermore, Portuguese Timor was also distinct in colonial Southeast Asia in that it had no underground communist movement--a situation owing, in equal parts, to the efficiency of the Portuguese secret police and to the lack of an educated native elite.
There is little doubt that the meeting President Soeharto had with Prime Minister Gough Whitlam at Wonosobo near Yogyarkarta in September 1974 was crucial for his decision to authorize action to bring about the incorporation of Portuguese Timor into the Indonesian Republic.
During the Wonosobo meeting, Whitlam understood that "the Indonesians hoped for the incorporation of Portuguese Timor as being in the best interests of the region, [and] of Indonesia and of Australia".
Despite the pressure from the Labor back bench and elsewhere, Whitlam and his government `remained opposed to Australian military involvement,'(4) and rejected any national argument that it should take on a broader political responsibility that might lead to a situation `where Australia was exercising a quasi-colonial role in Portuguese Timor, and might lead to the point that we were assuming some de facto responsibility for the territory'.(5)
"Beyond the array of island colonies that stretch across the Pacific from Chile's Rapa Nui to Australia's Papua and New Guinea at the outermost tip of southeast Asian nation lies a tiny, overlooked remnant of former European hegemony: Portuguese Timor. It is, unquestionably, at the `end of the earth'.

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