positron

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Related to Positrons: antimatter, Mesons, neutrinos

pos·i·tron

 (pŏz′ĭ-trŏn′)
n.
An elementary particle having the same mass and magnitude of charge as an electron but exhibiting a positive charge; the antiparticle of the electron. Also called antielectron.

positron

(ˈpɒzɪˌtrɒn)
n
(General Physics) physics the antiparticle of the electron, having the same mass but an equal and opposite charge. It is produced in certain decay processes and in pair production, annihilation occurring when it collides with an electron
[C20: from posi(tive + elec)tron]

pos•i•tron

(ˈpɒz ɪˌtrɒn)

n.
an elementary particle with the same mass as an electron but a positive charge; the antiparticle of the electron.
[1930–35; posi (tive) + (elec) tron]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.positron - an elementary particle with positive charge; interaction of a positron and an electron results in annihilation
antilepton - the antiparticle of a lepton
Translations
positró
positroni
positronpositon
pósitron
positron

positron

[ˈpɒzɪˌtrɒn] Npositrón m

positron

nPositron nt
References in periodicals archive ?
Positron emission tomography is a computed tomography medical procedure in which a computer-generated image of tissues is produced through the detection of gamma rays due to the decay of radionuclides and subsequent release of positrons.
Near-surface depth profiling of solids by mono-energetic positrons.
One theory held that they contained mainly electrons and their antimatter partners, positrons.
Moreover, only positrons are believed to be present, not antiprotons or entire antimatter atoms.
The patented IPA process involves examining materials with positrons generated by positron emitting sources or a small linear accelerator to create a distinct and readable signature of the defects or damage present in the material being tested.
Conceiving of a new, remarkably light variety of water, a pair of chemists calculate that it is possible to replace the hydrogen protons with antimatter particles known as positrons.
Eventually, the positrons collide with electrons in the material and are annihilated, releasing energy in the form of gamma rays.
By studying the radio emissions from the jets squirted out by the distant quasar 3C279, researchers have gathered the first compelling evidence that the jets consist mainly of electrons and their antiparticles, positrons.
Nonetheless, collisions in which positrons are sharply deflected seem to occur more frequently than expected, based on the standard model of particle physics.
The LEP collider, which accelerates electrons and positrons in a circular tunnel 26.
Physicists had already developed techniques for generating antiprotons and positrons in the laboratory.
That year, Perl was finding hints in the debris of collisions between high-energy electrons and positrons of a hitherto undiscovered lepton.