apostrophe

(redirected from Possessive apostrophe)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

apostrophe

An apostrophe is a punctuation mark that primarily serves to indicate either grammatical possession or the contraction of two words. It can also sometimes be used to pluralize irregular nouns, such as single letters, abbreviations, and single-digit numbers.
Continue reading...

a·pos·tro·phe 1

 (ə-pŏs′trə-fē)
n.
The superscript sign ( ' ), usually used to indicate the omission of a letter or letters from a word, the possessive case, or the plurals of numbers, letters, and abbreviations.

[French, from Late Latin apostrophus, from Greek apostrophos, from apostrephein, to turn away : apo-, apo- + strephein, to turn; see streb(h)- in Indo-European roots.]

ap′os·troph′ic (ăp′ə-strŏf′ĭk) adj.

a·pos·tro·phe 2

 (ə-pŏs′trə-fē)
n.
The direct address of an absent or imaginary person or of a personified abstraction, especially as a digression in the course of a speech or composition.

[Late Latin apostrophē, from Greek, from apostrephein, to turn away; see apostrophe1.]

ap′os·troph′ic (ăp′ə-strŏf′ĭk) adj.

apostrophe

(əˈpɒstrəfɪ)
n
the punctuation mark ' used to indicate the omission of a letter or number, such as he's for he has or he is, also used in English to form the possessive, as in John's father and twenty pounds' worth
[C17: from Late Latin, from Greek apostrophos mark of elision, from apostrephein to turn away]

apostrophe

(əˈpɒstrəfɪ)
n
(Rhetoric) rhetoric a digression from a discourse, esp an address to an imaginary or absent person or a personification
[C16: from Latin apostrophē, from Greek: a turning away, digression]
apostrophic adj

a•pos•tro•phe1

(əˈpɒs trə fi)

n.
the sign ('), as used: to indicate the omission of one or more letters in a word, whether unpronounced, as in o'er for over, or pronounced, as in gov't for government; to indicate the possessive case, as in woman's; or to indicate plurals of abbreviations and symbols, as in several M.D.'s, 3's.
[1580–90; < Middle French < Late Latin apostrophus < Greek apóstrophos (prosōidía) eliding (mark), <apostréphein to turn away = apo- + stréphein to turn; see strophe]
ap•os•troph•ic (ˌæp əˈstrɒf ɪk) adj.

a•pos•tro•phe2

(əˈpɒs trə fi)

n.
a digression in the form of an address to someone not present, or to a personified object or idea.
[1525–35; < Late Latin < Greek apostrophḗ a turning away, n. derivative of apostréphein; see apostrophe1]
ap•os•troph•ic (ˌæp əˈstrɒf ɪk) adj.

apostrophe

a variety of personification in which the dead, absent, or inanimate are addressed as if present. — apostrophic, adj.
See also: Rhetoric and Rhetorical Devices

apostrophe

1. A punctuation mark (’) used to show that a letter has been omitted or to indicate possession, such as in “David’s house.”
2. The act of addressing a person or object, whether present or not, while in the middle of a discourse.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.apostrophe - address to an absent or imaginary person
rhetorical device - a use of language that creates a literary effect (but often without regard for literal significance)
2.apostrophe - the mark (') used to indicate the omission of one or more letters from a printed wordapostrophe - the mark (') used to indicate the omission of one or more letters from a printed word
punctuation mark, punctuation - the marks used to clarify meaning by indicating separation of words into sentences and clauses and phrases
Translations
апостроф
apostrof
apostrof
heittomerkkiapostrofi
apostrofapostrofaizostavnik
aposztróf
apostrophe
úrfellingarmerki
アポストロフィ
아포스트로피
apostrofa
apostrofs
apostrof
apostrof
apostrofopuščaj
apostrof
เครื่องหมายวรรคตอน
dấu móc lửng

apostrophe

[əˈpɒstrəfɪ] N
1. (Ling) → apóstrofo m
2. (= address) → apóstrofe m

apostrophe

[əˈpɒstrəfi] napostrophe f

apostrophe

n
(Gram) → Apostroph m
(Liter) → Apostrophe f

apostrophe

[əˈpɒstrəfɪ] n (Gram) (sign) → apostrofo

apostrophe

(əˈpostrəfi) noun
a mark (') which is used to show that a letter or letters has/have been omitted from a word, and which is also used in possessive phrases and in the plurals of letters. the boy's coat; the boys' coats; There are two n's in `cannot' but only one in `can't'.

apostrophe

عَلامَة تُدِلُّ عَلَى حَذْف حَرْف apostrof apostrof Apostroph απόστροφος apóstrofe, apóstrofo heittomerkki apostrophe apostrof apostrofo アポストロフィ 아포스트로피 apostrof apostrof apostrof apóstrofo апостроф apostrof เครื่องหมายวรรคตอน kesme imi dấu móc lửng 撇号
References in periodicals archive ?
Two teachers admitted to never having learnt to use the possessive apostrophe morpheme and confessed, 'we have no idea about the possessive apostrophes' and 'could you please explain how to use the possessive apostrophe when we finish the questionnaire?
Page 45, paragraph 1, line 8: add a possessive apostrophe after "James".
In direct response to Magwal, my first letter addressed the use of the possessive apostrophe.
For example, the possessive apostrophe, once instilled into my generation along with mathematical tables and French grammar, is now almost defunct.
In twelve years I've only ever taught one student the possessive apostrophe well enough so that it has stuck, and so lesson after lesson, the box, no matter what absurd nomenclature it masqueraded under this week, has remained forever blank.
In the C19th, the authorities dropped the possessive apostrophe, but then replaced it.
A DECISION to drop the possessive apostrophe on city street signs has made Birmingham a laughing stock, it has been claimed.
Since the monarchy no longer own either Kings Heath or Kings Norton it is argued that it is no longer grammatically correct to include the possessive apostrophe.
When writing, deaf students may fail to include the possessive "s," the possessive apostrophe, or both.
My only quibble is that the copy-editor did not catch a constant and nagging grammatical mistake in the painting commentaries: the lack of the possessive apostrophe.