possessive pronoun

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possessive pronoun

n.
One of several pronouns designating possession and capable of substituting for noun phrases.
Translations
pronom possessiu
Possessivpronomenbesitzanzeigende Fürwort
pronombre posesivo
possessiivipronomini
birtokos névmás
eignarfornafn
pronomen possessivum
savybinis įvardis
zaimek dzierżawczy
pronome possessivo
possessivt pronomen

possessive pronoun

References in classic literature ?
Smallweed's favourite adjective of disparagement is so close to his tongue that he begins the words "my dear friend" with the monosyllable "brim," thus converting the possessive pronoun into brimmy and appearing to have an impediment in his speech.
Moreover, its genitive form [phrase omitted] 'my and yourSG/PL' and ablative form [phrase omitted] 'my and yourSG/PL' can also function as inclusive possessive pronouns.
9-16 Could do better You may be in the middle set, but noun phrases, modal verbs, possessive pronouns and subordinate clauses clearly still get your head in a spin.
Their topics include Descartes' error and the growth of consciousness: a non-dualistic reading of Genesis 1:1-7, possessing wisdom: a study of the possessive pronouns and adjectives in the Septuagint version of Proverbs, Old Greek Job--a surprise at the end of the road: intertextual connections between the epilogue and the prologue introduced by the translator, the meta-textual marginal notes of Ben Sira: ideology and theology in the Geneva Bible (1560) and the King James Version (1611), and introductory notes on Philo of Alexandria's "Proverbs" and idiomatic expressions.
He pats his gown a little, makes all the possessive pronouns his and then, only then, does he look for his chart.
While I didn't appreciate the dinner-time lessons on possessive pronouns and past participles (please don't ask me to define them), I am now thankful that I can (usually) string a sentence together.
Do not use apostrophes for possessive pronouns, such as ours, yours, hers, its, and theirs.
One of the differences I noticed between the English and Arabic languages is the use of possessive pronouns. In Arabic, when we want to ask the restaurant employee why the food we ordered is taking too long, Saudis usually say: "Where's the order?" But in English, people invariably say: "Where's my order?" At first, this seems like a trivial difference.
One thesis contained two first person possessive pronouns in the second move.
The English language does not include third person singular pronouns, possessive pronouns, and pronominal possessive adjectives that refer in the alternative to antecedents of the male gender, the female gender, or the neuter.
The changes traced in this study are the use of first and second person possessive pronouns, the third person singular present tense suffix, affirmative and negative do, and the subject relativiser who.
Nevertheless, this mistake is repeated in Williams (2005), but with the categories reversed (i.e., possessive pronouns as a subclass of determiner) and in Parrott (2010), this time with the my set being called adjectives, a subtype of determiner.