post-war

(redirected from Post-1945)

post-war

adj
happening or existing after a war: the early post-war years.
Translations

post-war

[ˈpəʊstˈwɔːʳ] ADJde la posguerra
the post-war periodla pos(t)guerra

post-war

adjNachkriegs-; event alsoin der Nachkriegszeit; post-war eraNachkriegszeit f; of the post-war eraaus der Nachkriegszeit; post-war Londondas London der Nachkriegszeit
References in periodicals archive ?
His topics include dependency theory in the post-1945 development literature of Latin America, neo-imperialism and neo-dependency: two sides of the same historical-political process,the US and Brazil: antagonistic cooperation, and sub-imperialism and the contemporary capitalist crisis.
The plot here features American astronaut James Washington (Christopher Kirby) landing on the dark side of the moon and discovering a post-1945 Nazi city.
Post-1945 there have been four players, none more famous than John Richards who turned out on the left wing against Northern Ireland at Goodison Park in 1973.
Peter Peckard, the broad-church anti-slavery advocate; African responses to Christian missionaries; John Bennett, a civil servant in the post-1945 Colonial Office; the nature of homosexual life in India as seen in Capt.
Whereas the academic development of international relations theory has largely been determined in the United States, no doubt due to its hegemonic place in the post-1945 world order, this volume by Telo (U.
an exhibition which explores Britain's involvement in conflict and peace post-1945.
The country by country treatment of the 1914-1945 and post-1945 periods privileges Iran over Turkey, even when it can be demonstrated that events in Tehran were influenced by those in Istanbul and Ankara, or Egypt, whose innovations often influenced the entire Arab world.
Marcuse has now given us a full-length account of the post-1945 history of the Dachau facility, first opened in 1933.
The club's highest post-1945 top division position is seventh and they have never been higher than ninth in the Premiership.
He was obsessed not so much with the factual horrors - he disliked the Holocaust 'Industry' - but with Jewish exiles, or survivors inside Germany, whose post-1945 lives had been ineradicably saddened by the loss of their pre-war European-Jewish culture.
Hahn also seeks to 'contribute to a better understanding between [Germany and Britain]', being rightly concerned about the persistent anti-German prejudice that was central to the 'post-modern parochialism' of British government and media during the period when the book was written, and about the growing threats to what Habermas recently described as the 'Siegeszug des demokratischen Rechtsstaates' in post-1945 Germany (quoted approvingly on page 242) that have emerged in the wake of unification.
But eternal Poland will always rise; Solidarity and the many post-1945 uprisings testify to it.