post-colonial

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post-colonial

adj
existing or occurring since a colony gained independence: post-colonial Nigeria.
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Two questions remain unanswered, though are productively raised by the collection: is every classroom a "postcolonial classroom" and to what extent can postcolonialism and multiculturalism be elided?
Resonance need not mean uniformity or consensus in its mindless or grudging sense, but rather what appears here and is often expressed as an agreement on the need for re-examination of that troublesome, sprawling, ever-changing central term, postcolonialism, and the evocative, provocative adverb with which it is paired in the title.
In contrast, postcolonialism continues to unite historians and literary scholars in a manner that resonates with various constituencies, including Canadian university students.
Islamism is not monolithic but a diverse and fragmented politicization of religion and culture in which people explore and figure out power relationships, postcolonialism, capitalism, modernity and Western hegemony.
But even if the viability of the term is conceded, many critics have wondered whether postcolonialism is a theoretical model sufficiently equipped to deal with the specific nature of Ireland's 'colonial' experience.
She will discuss her forthcoming University of Wales Press publication Postcolonialism Revisited ...Welsh Writing in English.
In a New York Times article published eleven days after the fall of the World Trade Center, Edward Rothstein made scathing comments about postcolonialism, saying, "While affirming most of the postmodern rejection of ideals and universals, postcolonialism establishes its own universal: Western imperialism becomes a variety of Original Sin.
In his "Afterword" noted postcolonial critic Gareth Griffiths recognizes the risk of postcolonialism's losing "its focus if it is broadened to discuss such a wide range of texts," but he concludes that "there is a clear need to address, in the widest possible way, as this collection does, the many issues raised at the intersections of postcolonialism, geography and the sacred" because it will "bring into open conversation some of our deepest and rarely scrutinized assumptions" (460).
The aim of this method is to place "postcolonialism" as a theoretical study in a wider social context in order to analyze its main problems as well as its prospects in reconstituting the cultural identity of African people and in providing a direction for African development.
Another recently named phenomenon that has begun to occupy an albeit lower place in the pantheon of theoretical names is postcolonialism. Like globalization, postcolonialism also encompasses a very wide range of theoretical considerations.
That is to say, I suppose, that we have met the enemy of postcolonialism and the enemy is us.
The authors have brought together five of the most interesting -- and some might say controversial -- topics currently practiced in human geography: anarchism, marxism, gender, sexual orientation, and postcolonialism. Linking each of these five topics/chapters is the theme of `dissident geographies': those geographies that "share a political commitment to overturning prevailing relations of power and oppression" (p.