Potiphar


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Pot·i·phar

 (pŏt′ə-fər)
n.
In the Bible, an officer of the Pharaoh who bought Joseph as a slave and later imprisoned him when Potiphar's wife falsely accused Joseph of rape.

[Hebrew pôṭîpar, from Egyptian p-di-p-r', the one whom Ra gave : p-, definite article + di, whom he gave + r', Ra.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Potiphar

(ˈpɒtɪfə)
n
(Bible) Old Testament one of Pharaoh's officers, who bought Joseph as a slave (Genesis 37:36)
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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Among these I found a treasure in Curtis's two books, the 'Nile Notes of a Howadji,' and the 'Howadji in Syria.' I already knew him by his 'Potiphar Papers,' and the ever-delightful reveries which have since gone under the name of 'Prue and I;' but those books of Eastern travel opened a new world of thinking and feeling.
The present generation can have little notion of the deep impression made upon the intelligence and conscience of the whole nation by the 'Potiphar Papers,' or how its fancy was rapt with the 'Prue and I' sketches, These are among the most veritable literary successes we have had, and probably we who were so glad when the author of these beautiful things turned aside from the flowery paths where he led us, to battle for freedom in the field of politics, would have felt the sacrifice too great if we could have dreamed it would be life-long.
A good housewife is of necessity a humbug; and Cornelia's husband was hoodwinked, as Potiphar was--only in a different way.
Soon he finds himself belonging to Potiphar whose wife makes advances toward Joseph and ultimately lands him behind bars.
In the house of his master, Potiphar, Joseph was favoured above other slaves and in prison; the same Joseph received favour above other prisoners.
After being sold into slavery by his brothers, he ingratiates himself with Egyptian noble Potiphar, but ends up in jail after refusing the advances of Potiphar's wife.
The sister in the blue crepe de Chine sees Joseph released from Potiphar's prison, and the old man there with Stetson still on is remembering Daniel in the lion's den.
After being sold into slavery by the brothers, he ingratiates himself with Egyptian noble Potiphar, but ends up in jail after refusing the advances of Potiphar's wife.
Derek Fawcett also plays Potiphar and understudies the roles of Pharaoh and Jacob.
Similarly, yad, "hand," is used repeatedly in Genesis 39, which tells the story of Joseph in Egypt, but when translators refer to Potiphar's having placed everything in Joseph's "care," "trust" or "charge" (Hebrew be-yado), they miss the connection with the young hero's escape from Potiphar's wife, minus his tunic, which he left "in her hand" (be-yadah).
It was a weekly sharing not troubled by what Hans Frei has described as the eclipse of biblical narrative, confident in the reasonableness and cogency of straightforward continuities with the lives of, say, Hannah, or Naomi, or Peter, or Potiphar, or Psalm 22's cry of forsakenness.
Biblical good looks frequently signal problems ahead: consider Jacob's "handsome and good-looking" son Joseph, who gets grabbed by Potiphar's lusty wife (Gen.