Potiphar

(redirected from Potiphar's wife)
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Pot·i·phar

 (pŏt′ə-fər)
n.
In the Bible, an officer of the Pharaoh who bought Joseph as a slave and later imprisoned him when Potiphar's wife falsely accused Joseph of rape.

[Hebrew pôṭîpar, from Egyptian p-di-p-r', the one whom Ra gave : p-, definite article + di, whom he gave + r', Ra.]

Potiphar

(ˈpɒtɪfə)
n
(Bible) Old Testament one of Pharaoh's officers, who bought Joseph as a slave (Genesis 37:36)
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References in periodicals archive ?
After being sold into slavery by his brothers, he ingratiates himself with Egyptian noble Potiphar, but ends up in jail after refusing the advances of Potiphar's wife.
After being sold into slavery by the brothers, he ingratiates himself with Egyptian noble Potiphar, but ends up in jail after refusing the advances of Potiphar's wife.
Jenna Fawcett also plays Potiphar's wife and understudies the Narrator, and Benjamin Salt understudies Joseph.
Similarly, yad, "hand," is used repeatedly in Genesis 39, which tells the story of Joseph in Egypt, but when translators refer to Potiphar's having placed everything in Joseph's "care," "trust" or "charge" (Hebrew be-yado), they miss the connection with the young hero's escape from Potiphar's wife, minus his tunic, which he left "in her hand" (be-yadah).
Moreover, there is a sculpted part that tells the story of Joseph and Zuleikha , Potiphar's wife. Potiphar is said to have been the captain of the palace guard in Egypt.
Commentaries which speak negatively about biblical figures have survived, and some of those are about Joseph, for example TB Sotah 36b presents the opinion that Joseph had decided to yield to the advances of Potiphar's wife, and Bereishit Rabbah 89:3 states that Joseph did not have enough faith that God would rescue him from imprisonment.
Based on an early-twentieth-century zarzuela by Miguel de Palacios and Guillermo Perrin that had the distinction of being banned in Spain for blasphemy during the Franco regime, the movie replays the Old Testament story of Joseph and Potiphar's wife as arty sex farce, filled with comic anachronisms and an abundance of wittily faux-Egyptian dances.
In the King's Presence Chamber is the most spectacular of the impressive list of loans that have been secured: the enormous canvas by Orazio Gentileschi depicting Joseph quitting the amorous advances of Potiphar's wife. It is one of the history paintings known to have hung in the Queen's House during Charles I's lifetime, but was sold off by the Commonwealth.
Here, we find the unfinished Biblical epic Josephus, dedicated to Cardinal Alessandro Farnese and centering on the Old Testament story of Joseph and Potiphar's Wife. We also find the Carminum Liber, a collection of poems, predominantly occasional poetry and fragments of varying length and topic, composed sporadically throughout Fracastoro's lifetime.
Incidentally, such detail cannot but recall the seductive clutches of Potiphar's wife, who in the Judeo-Christian Scripture is otherwise anonymous.
POTIPHAR'S WIFE: THE VATICAN'S SECRET AND CHILD SEXUAL ABUSE
Leeming chooses to limit the number of Judeo-Christian references in comparative lists, omitting Genesis from creation lore, David from culture heroes and homosexuality, "the deep" from primordial waters, Laban from tricksters, Joseph and Potiphar's wife from the femme fatale, and Jacob/Esau from twins.