Potawatomi

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Pot·a·wat·o·mi

 (pŏt′ə-wŏt′ə-mē)
n. pl. Potawatomi or Pot·a·wat·o·mis
1. A member of a Native American people variously located in Michigan, Wisconsin, northern Illinois, and northern Indiana in the 1600s to the 1800s, with present-day populations in Oklahoma, Kansas, Michigan, Wisconsin, and Ontario.
2. The Algonquian language of the Potawatomi.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Pot•a•wat•o•mi

(ˌpɒt əˈwɒt ə mi)

n., pl. -mis, (esp. collectively) -mi.
1. a member of an American Indian people residing in SW Michigan and E Wisconsin in the 17th century: later widely dispersed, and now living mainly in Kansas, Oklahoma, Wisconsin, and Michigan.
2. the Algonquian language of the Potawatomi.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Potawatomi - a member of the Algonquian people originally of Michigan and WisconsinPotawatomi - a member of the Algonquian people originally of Michigan and Wisconsin
Algonquian, Algonquin - a member of any of the North American Indian groups speaking an Algonquian language and originally living in the subarctic regions of eastern Canada; many Algonquian tribes migrated south into the woodlands from the Mississippi River to the Atlantic coast
2.Potawatomi - the Algonquian language spoken by the Potawatomi
Algonquian language, Algonquin, Algonquian - family of North American Indian languages spoken from Labrador to South Carolina and west to the Great Plains
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
In a press conference, Citizen Potowatomi Nation Police Chief James Collard offered almost no details about the shooting to "protect the integrity of the investigation," he said.
Many nations of Native Americans are currently represented in Indiana, including Miami, Cherokee, Potowatomi, Latin American Indians, and members of over 250 other tribes as well as non-specified or double or mixed Native American heritage.
The Ojibway, Odawa and Potowatomi Nations formed the confederacy in times before European influence in North America.