Potteries


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Pot·ter·ies

 (pŏt′ə-rēz)
A district of west-central England in the Trent River valley. It has been noted for the manufacture of ceramics since the 1600s. Josiah Wedgwood and Josiah Spode were among the noted potters who worked in the area.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Potteries

(ˈpɒtərɪz)
pl n
(Placename) the Potteries (sometimes functioning as singular) a region of W central England, in Staffordshire, in which the china and earthenware industries are concentrated
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in classic literature ?
It reminded me, more than anything else, of the Potteries at night.
It was a form of human industry, perverse indeed, but still an industry exercised in an industrious world; it was work undertaken for the same reason as the work in potteries, in coal mines, in fields, in tool-grinding shops.
Some of the most fascinating items in the archive are the many design books from various studios within the Royal Doulton company that cover Doulton wares produced at Lambeth and also in the Potteries, principally at their former Nile Street works.
Unlike several other potteries in the early 1900s, Muncie pottery pieces were not decorated with surface paintings.
A total of 31 separate potteries are known to have operated at various locations in the town and district during the 600 year period between the 13th century and the closure of the last potteries in the 1940s.
In 1922 Gurcharan married Chattar Kaur, Sardar Ram Singh Kabli's daughter, and went back to work at Delhi Potteries where he started to produce some amount of art pieces along with tableware.
My wife and I discovered Stoin's work as we developed a plan to guide future acquisitions, eventually using his associations with nearly a dozen potteries as that plan.
In competition with the Staffordshire Potteries, whose dominance they attempted to challenge, their products were of a quality that matched and often exceeded that of established firms like Wedgwood but the challenge could not be sustained.
Al-A'li village, west of the Bahraini capital, has remained the major location for the potteries' making since more than a century ago.
Kuma started production at Mfensi in 1968 and has trained many potters who have also trained others, leading to the impressive network of potteries in the vast village.
ere have been potteries operating in the Farnham area since Roman times and during the 16th century Farnham supplied London with much of its pottery.