praeses


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praeses

(ˈpriːsɪz)
n
1. (Historical Terms) a Roman governor, esp a provincial governor, from the 2nd century AD
2. the chair or president of a society or meeting
3. (Education) (in a university) someone who presides over doctoral examinations; moderator; supervisor
References in periodicals archive ?
Rod de la Rosa, SVD, Praeses of Villa Cristo Rey, the retirement house of our elderly and sick SVD confreres.
PocketRx app was developed by Praeses LLC and will provide software development and support for Digital Pharmacist.
Praeses collegii iudicantis statuit dein obiectum iudicii sub formula sequentis dubii: <<Se consti la nullita di questo matrimonio per errore dell'uomo sulla donna a norma del can.
In the passio Anastasiae, the sisters Agape, Chionia and Irene are in danger of being raped: the praeses Dulcitius is overcome with a filthy desire ([section] 12 turpissimus spiritus) and visits them in prison.
The Church of Norway had a very capable and proactive delegation, led by praeses Helga Haugland Byfuglien, ably prepared and supported by Berit Hagen Agoy--general secretary of the Church of Norway Council on Ecumenical and International Relations--and her staff.
Praesidatus means the office of praeses, not the presidency of the council of decurions as suggested by Pharr, Cl.
Sometimes the respondent did, but often it was the praeses (the professor supervising the dissertation and the defense).
Theologica: non enim Emus Praeses vel Secretarius Commissionis Theologicae publice respondere possunt et dicere se omnino non consentire.
At its very center is Morde-chai Chaim Rumkowski, the Chairman, or Praeses (King) of the ghetto, who, in a unique arrangement, was chosen by the Nazis to establish a workforce of his fellow Jews, corralled by barbed wire in Lodz, in order to supply their oppressors with goods and profit.
Y, citando a Santo Tomas, explica: <<Et e contrario, sunt iniustae vel ubi deest auctoritas, vel cum praeses imponit onera subditis non pertinentia ad utilitatem communem, sed magis pro propia commoditate, vel cupiditate, vel gloria, vel etiam aliorum privatorum, vel etiam ex forma, cum inaequaliter onera dispensantur, etiam si ordinentur ad bonum commune, vel etiam si faciat contra ius divinum>>; cfr.
50) In 400, the Jew Lectorius was elevated to the rank of praeses of the Balaeric islands, and in 418 both Theodore and Caecilianus, Equestrian Jews of Minorca, held the military title of defensor civitatis.