pragmatism

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prag·ma·tism

(prăg′mə-tĭz′əm)
n.
1. Philosophy A movement consisting of varying but associated theories, originally developed by Charles S. Peirce and William James and distinguished by the doctrine that the meaning or truth value of an idea or a proposition lies in its observable practical consequences.
2. A practical, matter-of-fact way of approaching or assessing situations or of solving problems.

prag′ma·tist n.
prag′ma·tis′tic adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

pragmatism

(ˈpræɡməˌtɪzəm)
n
1. action or policy dictated by consideration of the immediate practical consequences rather than by theory or dogma
2. (Philosophy) philosophy
a. the doctrine that the content of a concept consists only in its practical applicability
b. the doctrine that truth consists not in correspondence with the facts but in successful coherence with experience. See also instrumentalism
ˈpragmatist n, adj
ˌpragmaˈtistic adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

prag•ma•tism

(ˈpræg məˌtɪz əm)

n.
1. character or conduct that emphasizes practical results or concerns rather than theory or principle.
2. a philosophical movement or system having various forms, but generally stressing practical consequences as constituting the essential criterion in determining meaning, truth, or value.
[1860–65]
prag′ma•tist, n., adj.
prag`ma•tis′tic, adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

pragmatism

a philosophical system stressing practical consequences and values as standards by which the validity of concepts are to be determined. — pragmatist, n., adj.pragmatistic, adj.
See also: Philosophy
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

pragmatism

An American philosophical school; the view that the meaning of things is in their practical relation to people.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pragmatism - (philosophy) the doctrine that practical consequences are the criteria of knowledge and meaning and value
instrumentalism - a system of pragmatic philosophy that considers idea to be instruments that should guide our actions and their value is measured by their success
philosophy - the rational investigation of questions about existence and knowledge and ethics
philosophical doctrine, philosophical theory - a doctrine accepted by adherents to a philosophy
2.pragmatism - the attribute of accepting the facts of life and favoring practicality and literal truth
practicality - concerned with actual use rather than theoretical possibilities
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
pragmatisme
pragmatismo

pragmatism

[ˈprægmətɪzəm] Npragmatismo m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

pragmatism

[ˈprægmətɪzəm] npragmatisme m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

pragmatism

nPragmatismus m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

pragmatism

[ˈprægməˌtɪzm] npragmatismo
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
For the same reason, the holist also has a plausible claim to being an heir to the pragmatist tradition. (149) In a sense, she takes even more seriously than do the other two sorts of pragmatist the difficulty posed by James' original dilemma--between empiricism and rationalism, optimism and pessimism, idealism and materialism, "free-willism" and determinism.
However, given the quality of Stroud's historical treatment of Dewey and the manner in which he expands Dewey's aesthetics, this book will certainly be of interest to seasoned Dewey scholars and has great value for those working in the pragmatist tradition. Further, the book also powerfully contests a variety of aesthetic theories from prominent 20th-century scholars working within the analytic tradition.
In my Oxford Locke Lectures, "Between Saying and Doing," I synthesize the pragmatist tradition and the analytic tradition out of concern with language, not as a formal structure but as a feature of the natural history of beings like us.
Rorty, indeed, suggests that the American pragmatist tradition can be usefully defined by its strong preference for the future over the past (in all its aspects).
The pragmatist tradition argues that this is the best way to think of justice claims.
So also is his thorough exposition of the American culture of experience in the pragmatist tradition of James, Dewey and Rorty exhaustive and insightful.