Prairie School

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Related to Prairie Houses: Prairie School architecture

Prairie School

n.
A group of American architects practicing mainly in the Midwest in the early 1900s, whose designs for low, horizontally extended houses and emphasis on natural materials were influenced especially by Frank Lloyd Wright.

[From the use of horizontal lines in imitation of the flatness of the Midwestern prairie.]
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Wright made his debut as an architect with his "prairie houses." These were long and low single-story houses made of unpainted and unstained wood that reflected the broad and flat landscape of the U.S Midwest.
IN BUSINESS FOR HIMSELF, SOON WITH A crew of seven under him, Wright presently performed marvels--the Prairie Houses, which flourished during the first decade of the 1900s, pre-eminent among them; he built some 40.
At the beginning of the 20th century, he established his name with his Prairie Houses, characterized by an architectural style that was for the first time in American history completely free of European influences.
Wingspread, described by Wright as "the last of the prairie houses," is now a conference center for The Johnson Foundation.
Wright applied to public buildings the same general principles of space and streamlining used in his Prairie houses.
Neil Levine suggests, in the accompanying catalogue, that the pinwheeling Prairie Houses already anticipated their serial production within the Chicago gridiron.
He named his structures 'Prairie Houses.' They achieved early popularity with their gently sloping roofs, minimal terraces and extensions.