prairie

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Related to Prairies: Canadian Prairies

prai·rie

 (prâr′ē)
n.
An extensive flat or rolling area dominated by grasses, especially the grasslands that once covered much of central North America.

[French, from Old French praierie, from Vulgar Latin *prātāria, from Latin prāta, meadow.]

prairie

(ˈprɛərɪ)
n
(Physical Geography) (often plural) a treeless grassy plain of the central US and S Canada. Compare pampas, steppe, savanna
[C18: from French, from Old French praierie, from Latin prātum meadow]

prai•rie

(ˈprɛər i)

n.
1. an extensive, level or undulating, mostly treeless tract of land esp. in the Mississippi valley, orig. covered with coarse grasses.
2. a tract of grassland; meadow.
[1675–85; < French: meadow < Vulgar Latin *prātāria= Latin prāt(um) meadow + -āria, feminine of -ārius -ary]

prai·rie

(prâr′ē)
An extensive area of flat or rolling grassland, especially the large plain of central North America.

prairie

An extensive open area of flat grassland, especially in the central plains of North America.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.prairie - a treeless grassy plainprairie - a treeless grassy plain    
grassland - land where grass or grasslike vegetation grows and is the dominant form of plant life
Translations
prérie
prærie
preeria
prerija
préri
gresja
prerija
prērija
ağaçsız geniş çayırlık ova

prairie

[ˈprɛərɪ]
A. Npradera f, llanura f, pampa f (LAm)
the Prairies (US) → las Grandes Llanuras
B. CPD prairie dog Nperro m de las praderas
prairie oyster N (US) huevo crudo y sazonado que se toma en una bebida alcohólica
prairie wolf Ncoyote m

prairie

[ˈprɛəri] nprairie f
the prairies → la Prairieprairie dog nchien m de prairie

prairie

nGrassteppe f; (in North America) → Prärie f

prairie

:
prairie chicken
n (US) → Präriehuhn nt
prairie dog
nPräriehund m
prairie oyster
nPrärieauster f
prairie schooner
nPlanwagen m
prairie wolf
nPräriewolf m

prairie

[ˈprɛərɪ] nprateria
the prairies → le grandi praterie

prairie

(ˈpreəri) noun
(often in plural) in North America, an area of flat, treeless, grass-covered land.
References in classic literature ?
Departure from Fort Osage Modes of transportation Pack- horses Wagons Walker and Cerre; their characters Buoyant feelings on launching upon the prairies Wild equipments of the trappers Their gambols and antics Difference of character between the American and French trappers Agency of the Kansas General Clarke White Plume, the Kansas chief Night scene in a trader's camp Colloquy between White Plume and the captain Bee- hunters Their expeditions Their feuds with the Indians Bargaining talent of White Plume
The chief difficulty occurs in passing the deep ravines cut through the prairies by streams and winter torrents.
The wagons, also, would be more easily defended, and might form a kind of fortification in case of attack in the open prairies. A train of twenty wagons, drawn by oxen, or by four mules or horses each, and laden with merchandise, ammunition, and provisions, were disposed in two columns in the center of the party, which was equally divided into a van and a rear-guard.
It was a great object with Captain Bonneville to get to the mountains before the summer heats and summer flies should render the travelling across the prairies distressing; and before the annual assemblages of people connected with the fur trade should have broken up, and dispersed to the hunting grounds.
This broad but shallow stream flows for an immense distance through a wide and verdant valley scooped out of boundless prairies. It draws its main supplies, by several forks or branches, from the Rocky Mountains.
At night, also, the lurid reflection of immense fires hung in the sky, showing the conflagration of great tracts of the prairies. Such fires not being made by hunters so late in the season, it was supposed they were caused by some wandering war parties.
The Omahas were once one of the numerous and powerful tribes of the prairies, vying in warlike might and prowess with the Sioux, the Pawnees, the Sauks, the Konsas, and the Iatans.
At one time, when pursuing a war party by their tracks across the prairies, he repeatedly discharged his rifle into the prints made by their feet and by the hoofs of their horses, assuring his followers that he would thereby cripple the fugitives, so that they would easily be overtaken.
Almost every day she came running across the prairie to have her reading lesson with me.
Some gamesome wights will tell you that they have to plant weeds there, they don't grow naturally; that they import Canada thistles; that they have to send beyond seas for a spile to stop a leak in an oil cask; that pieces of wood in Nantucket are carried about like bits of the true cross in Rome; that people there plant toadstools before their houses, to get under the shade in summer time; that one blade of grass makes an oasis, three blades in a day's walk a prairie; that they wear quicksand shoes, something like Laplander snowshoes; that they are so shut up, belted about, every way inclosed, surrounded, and made an utter island of by the ocean, that to their very chairs and tables small clams will sometimes be found adhering, as to the backs of sea turtles.
"The Prairie" was the third in order of Fenimore Cooper's Leatherstocking Tales.
Precaution, 1820; The Spy, 1821; The Pioneers, 1823; The Pilot, 1823; Lionel Lincoln, or the Leaguer of Boston, 1825; The Last of the Mohicans, 1826; The Prairie, 1827; The Red Rover, 1828; Notions of the Americans, 1828; The Wept of Wish-ton-Wish, 1829; The Water-witch,