Preapprehension

Pre`ap`pre`hen´sion


n.1.An apprehension or opinion formed before examination or knowledge.
References in periodicals archive ?
(32) Lastly, and perhaps, most uncannily in Kafka's preapprehension in this story, is the attitude of the Explorer.
Just before this final fatal juncture of The Trial, Kafka inserted a conundrum of pure irony: "Logic is doubtless unshakeable, but it cannot withstand a man who wants to go on living." (47) With this statement, it seems to me, The Trial springs forward from its echoes of the other tales and, indeed, transcends being a preapprehension of the Holocaust.
In acts of knowledge and volition, a person experiences the inexhaustible depth and richness of the totality of being; this experience is an unthematic, nonconceptualized preapprehension of God as the end of all dynamic acts of the human spirit.
To have this awareness, Rahner argues, one already has a preapprehension or pregrasp (vorgriff) of the unlimited, infinite horizon or total context of all being.
229-33; the difference between Rahner and Lonergan on this point is rooted in the difference between Rahner's preapprehension of being and Lonergan's open, unrestricted desire to know, which is a pure heuristic notion or anticipation of being.
This yearning means that the human person possesses an openness to the infinite that constitutes a "preapprehension" of it.