Precipitious

Prec`i`pi´tious


a.1.Precipitous.
Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary, published 1913 by G. & C. Merriam Co.
References in periodicals archive ?
Giles (1960) had suggested that in poorly controlled and precipitious delivery of the head the pressure gradient is high and the chances of retinal haemorrhage developing is high.
The Indonesian word curam (steep, sheer, precipitious, abrupt (of a cliff/abyss, etc.)) (Stevens & Schmidgall-Tellings 2004, 217) also suggests the possibility that the inscriptions [Y.sup.S] des and [Y.sup.S] de [d.sup.o] stem from a Portuguese word such as despenhadeiro (precipice, cliff, crag) (Taylor 1970, 221).
Hearkening I heard again In my precipitious city beaten bells Winnow the keen sea wind.
Or the fascinating Marine Drive around the headland, where the road chings to the precipitious rock face on a thrill-a-minute four-mile long circumnavigation.
(11) See ALLEN, supra note 3, at 7-20 (discussing "wide and precipitious decline of penal rehabilitationism" as a foundational theory for the criminal justice system).
Since the economy was in apparently precipitious decline, this amounted to a rapid demobilization.
Part of what's driving the aggressive bidding, he says, is that today, with some companies set up strictly as servicing companies, and with the "precipitious runoff" of loans, the people who put their capital in a servicing operation, in order to sustain their growth plans, will need to go and buy more product."
On the opposite end of the age spectrum, there has been a precipitious decline in the employment of older workers.
They're painted bright yellow, with large windows and, for safety on the precipitious roadways, three separate brake systems.