predella


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predella

(prɪˈdɛlə; Italian preˈdɛlla)
n, pl -le (-liː; Italian -le)
1. (Art Terms) a painting or sculpture or a series of small paintings or sculptures in a long narrow strip forming the lower edge of an altarpiece or the face of an altar step or platform
2. (Architecture) a platform in a church upon which the altar stands
[C19: from Italian: stool, step, probably from Old High German bret board]
References in periodicals archive ?
But the history of the shaped canvas stretches back into the Renaissance and Medieval period, where painting was wedded to architecture through the multi-panel predella, the arc of cathedral spaces and their high vaulted ceilings.
One might have thought of a transom window over a doorway, or perhaps a predella incongruously placed above rather than below the main panel of an altarpiece.
It includes a small altarpiece (a sadly damaged Entombment from Washington) and a triptych (from Palazzo Corsini in Rome), predella panels (from the Annalena altarpiece), and even one of the painted cupboard doors of a chest for silver (the Armadio degli Argenti) for the church of the Santissima Annunziata.
Two monumental altarpieces, an intricate series of panels from his Silver Chest (Armadio degli Argenti), a precious triptych for private devotion, and nine predella scenes join the four reliquaries in a dramatic installation evocative of their Renaissance context.
(19) Domenico Veneziano's predella of the stabbing to death of St Lucy captures the moment that the knife penetrates her neck but shows no blood.
The other two works include a miniature at the bottom of the opening text page of the revised statutes of 1501, and one of the predella panels by Ridolfo Ghirlandaio at the base of the gilded wooden tabernacle added in 1515 as a framework to the Misericordia Altarpiece in the oratory of the early seat of the confraternity (Figs.
The main panel containing the image of the Adoration of the Magi was placed in the newly created Pinacoteca Nazionale of Siena while the predella was divided into three sections: one (Saints and Crucifixion) finding its way to the Lindenau-Museum of Altenburg, Germany; another (Seven Saints in Adoration) to the University of Virginia Art Museum; and the third now presumably lost.
Three episodes of the story are confined to the altarpiece's predella (Humfrey, "Cima da Conegliano" 362).
Giovanni e Paolo, school of Giovanni Bellini, polyptych and predella panels; reproduction, Kaftal, Saints in North East Italy, figures 1389, 1394, 1395, 1397, 1398; (5) Vienna, Kunsthistorisches Museum, and Oxford, Ashmolean, Bartolomeo degli Erri, polyptych (formerly at S.