predicable

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pred·i·ca·ble

(prĕd′ĭ-kə-bəl)
adj.
Capable of being stated or predicated: a predicable conclusion.
n. Philosophy
1. Something, such as a general quality or attribute, that can be predicated.
2. One of the general attributes of a subject or class. In scholastic thought, the attributes are genus, species, property, differentia, and accident; in Aristotelian thought, they are definition, genus, proprium, and accident.

[Late Latin praedicābilis, from praedicāre, to proclaim publicly, preach, predicate; see preach.]

pred′i·ca·bil′i·ty, pred′i·ca·ble·ness n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

predicable

(ˈprɛdɪkəbəl)
adj
capable of being predicated or asserted
n
1. a quality, attribute, etc, that can be predicated
2. (Logic) logic obsolete one of the five Aristotelian classes of predicates (the five heads of predicables), namely genus, species, difference, property, and relation
[C16: from Latin praedicābilis, from praedicāre to assert publicly; see predicate, preach]
ˌpredicaˈbility, ˈpredicableness n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

pred•i•ca•ble

(ˈprɛd ɪ kə bəl)

adj.
1. able to be predicated or affirmed; assertable.
n.
2. that which may be predicated; an attribute.
3. Logic. any one of the various kinds of predicate that may be used of a subject.
[1545–55; < Latin praedicābilis assertable, Latin: praiseworthy =praedicā(re) to declare publicly (see predicate) + -bilis -ble]
pred`i•ca•bil′i•ty, pred′i•ca•ble•ness, n.
pred′i•ca•bly, adv.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
Translations

predicable

adj to be predicable of somethingvon etw ausgesagt or behauptet werden können
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
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References in classic literature ?
Of things themselves some are predicable of a subject, and are never present in a subject.
Some things, again, are present in a subject, but are never predicable of a subject.
Other things, again, are both predicable of a subject and present in a subject.
There is, lastly, a class of things which are neither present in a subject nor predicable of a subject, such as the individual man or the individual horse.
The content of the work mostly covers the Aristotelian logic (propositions, predicables, categories, remarks after the categories, syllogism, topics, sophistical topics).
[CL] Las constantes logicas son predicables de orden superior, cuyos argumentos son predicables n-adicos (n [mayor que o igual a] 0), esto es, conceptos y proposiciones.
The present volume is the first of two and contains Valla's Book I, addressing categories, transcendental, and predicables and discussing natural and moral philosophy and theology.
(30.) As Lechner, 68-68, points out, in practice the analytic topics deriving from the categories and predicables sometimes became confused with what Aristotle called the "special" or subject topics.
Grandy and Warner, Oxford, 1986), particulars Have their predicables; whereas, Forms Are their predicables.