prediction

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pre·dic·tion

 (prĭ-dĭk′shən)
n.
1. The act of predicting.
2. Something foretold or predicted; a prophecy.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

prediction

(prɪˈdɪkʃən)
n
1. the act of predicting
2. something predicted; a forecast, prophecy, etc
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

pre•dic•tion

(prɪˈdɪk ʃən)

n.
1. the act of predicting.
2. an instance of this; something predicted; prophecy.
[1555–65; < Latin]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.prediction - the act of predicting (as by reasoning about the future)prediction - the act of predicting (as by reasoning about the future)
abstract thought, logical thinking, reasoning - thinking that is coherent and logical
projection - a prediction made by extrapolating from past observations
prophecy, vaticination, prognostication - knowledge of the future (usually said to be obtained from a divine source)
adumbration, foreshadowing, prefiguration - the act of providing vague advance indications; representing beforehand
2.prediction - a statement made about the future
statement - a message that is stated or declared; a communication (oral or written) setting forth particulars or facts etc; "according to his statement he was in London on that day"
extropy - the prediction that human intelligence and technology will enable life to expand in an orderly way throughout the entire universe
fortunetelling - the practice of predicting people's futures (usually for payment)
horoscope - a prediction of someone's future based on the relative positions of the planets
meteorology, weather forecasting - predicting what the weather will be
forecast, prognosis - a prediction about how something (as the weather) will develop
divination, prophecy - a prediction uttered under divine inspiration
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

prediction

noun prophecy, forecast, prognosis, divination, prognostication, augury, soothsaying, sortilege He was unwilling to make a prediction for the coming year. see divination
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

prediction

noun
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
تنَبًّؤ، تَكَهُّن
předpověď
forudsigelsespådom
jóslás
spá
napoved
önceden kestirmetahmin

prediction

[prɪˈdɪkʃən] N
1. (= forecast) (by expert, layman) → predicción f; (by clairvoyant, oracle) → vaticinio m, profecía f
their prediction that house prices would fallsu predicción de que el precio de la vivienda iba a bajar
there were dire predictions that thousands would die of malnutritionhubo predicciones alarmantes de que miles de personas morirían por desnutrición
to make a prediction about sthpronosticar or predecir algo
2. (= act) weather prediction has never been a perfect sciencepronosticar el tiempo nunca ha sido una ciencia exacta
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

prediction

[prɪˈdɪkʃən] nprédiction f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

prediction

nProphezeiung f, → Voraussage f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

prediction

[prɪˈdɪkʃn] npredizione f
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

predict

(priˈdikt) verb
to say in advance; to foretell. He predicted a change in the weather.
preˈdictable adjective
(negative unpredictable) able to be foretold. His anger was predictable.
preˈdiction (-ʃən) noun
I'm making no predictions about the result of the race.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
I MEAN not to speak of divine prophecies; nor of heathen oracles; nor of natural predictions; but only of prophecies that have been of certain memory, and from hidden causes.
He possessed illegal convictions in his mind along the subjects of black cats, lucky numbers, and the weather predictions in the papers.
The greater number of the young women, who envied Anna and had long been weary of hearing her called virtuous, rejoiced at the fulfillment of their predictions, and were only waiting for a decisive turn in public opinion to fall upon her with all the weight of their scorn.
The love-story of my boyhood, in all its particulars, down even to the gift of the green flag; the mystic predictions of Dame Dermody; the loss of every trace of my little Mary of former days; the rescue of Mrs.
Elton, from the particulars detailed by her husband, thought it all extremely shabby, and very inferior to her own."Very little white satin, very few lace veils; a most pitiful business!Selina would stare when she heard of it."But, in spite of these deficiencies, the wishes, the hopes, the confidence, the predictions of the small band of true friends who witnessed the ceremony, were fully answered in the perfect happiness of the union.
He often corrected, with a few clear words, the thousand conjectures advanced by members of the club as to lost and unheard-of travellers, pointing out the true probabilities, and seeming as if gifted with a sort of second sight, so often did events justify his predictions. He must have travelled everywhere, at least in the spirit.
The morning, in spite of Matthew's predictions, was fine and Anne's spirits soared to their highest.
"Hush, let's hear the rest of the predictions," said Cecily.
These are interpreted by the superstitious Indians into warnings that strangers are at hand; and one accidental coincidence, like the chance fulfillment of an almanac prediction, is sufficient to cover a thousand failures.
With high hope for the future, no prediction in regard to it is ventured.
She remembered the Countess's prediction. 'You have to bring me to the day of discovery, and to the punishment that is my doom.' Had the prediction simply faded, like other mortal prophecies?-- or had it been fulfilled on the terrible night when she had seen the apparition, and when she had innocently tempted the Countess to watch her in her room?
During one of these visits he completed his estimates of the rate of movement of the glacier which had swallowed up the three guides, and uttered the prediction that the glacier would deliver up its dead at the foot of the mountain thirty-five years from the time of the accident, or possibly forty.

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