Premonstratensian

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Premonstratensian

(ˌpriːˌmɒnstrəˈtɛnsɪən)
n
(Roman Catholic Church)
a. a member of a religious order founded at Prémontré in N France in 1120 by St Norbert (about 1080–1134)
b. (as modifier): a Premonstratensian canon.
[C17: from Medieval Latin (locus) praemonstrātus the place foreshown, because it was said to have been prophetically pointed out by St Norbert]
References in periodicals archive ?
Hames on the debated 'conversion' account of Herman the Jew, in which he agrees with Jean-Claude Schmitt that it was a propaganda victory for the Premonstratensians, while conceding that it did draw on his own experience.
Norbert High School, established by the Premonstratensians in Godollo, thirty kilometres northeast of Budapest, in 1925.
s view, "the Opusculum is, as a text, a perfectly coherent ideological construction of the Premonstratensians of Cappenberg" (196).
This was especially the case for the Cistercians and Premonstratensians, who became impressively powerful under papal protection (28).
Albans and Westminster (and also Gloucester College, Oxford), the Premonstratensians of Titchfield, the Augustinians of Leicester and the Bridgettines of Syon" (147).
His establishment became the beginning of a successful order, the Canons Regular of Premontre, also known as the Premonstratensians or Norbertines.
the Augustinians, Premonstratensians, Dominicans, Franciscans, and Capuchins, the last a schismatic growth of the Franciscans) were not only to be found everywhere in Catholic Europe but were growing.
Chatillon points out, we should not be too quick to assume that the Premonstratensians (Norbertines) of Joyenval associated the crescents with Islam, it is clear that the crescents had pagan value for the author of the poem.
The contemporary monastery is Romanesque with a baroque chapel and houses a community of contemplative Premonstratensians, also known as the Norbertines.
The place of women amongst the Cistercians, Premonstratensians, and Gilbertines is also well examined.
The Libraries of the Cistercians, Gilbertines and Premonstratensians, Corpus of British Medieval Library Catalogues, 3 (London, 1992), Z19.
The organ part for the entire collection, "Organo", printed in 1653, Royal Canonry of Premonstratensians at Strahov, personal effects of Romuald Perlik.