premotion

Related to premotion: premonition, promotion

premotion

(priːˈməʊʃən)
n
a previous motion
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
(181) The expansive opportunity for amendment in European opposition proceedings eliminates the necessity of a premotion conference because a patent holder who is unsuccessful in a main request for amendment may rely on an auxiliary request or new amendment.
Divine Causality and Human Free Choice: Domingo Ba[+ or -]ez, Physical Premotion and the Controversy de Auxiliis Revisited
Hence, God knows which graces will be rejected and by whom, precisely because God's sovereign will is the transcendent cause of all graces, predetermining which are to be inefficacious, as God must will for every act a physical premotion that specifies the nature of
More precisely, he says, "We agree with the Bannezian [sic] synthesis of premotion, application, instrumental participation, and fate, but we think the explanation of the transition from rest to activity found in In VIII Phys., lect.
One product of this notion that every choice must be preceded by a particular premotion is the hard distinction between "sufficient" grace and "efficacious" grace: the former indicates grace that, while intrinsically efficacious, does not fructify; the latter indicates grace that actually yields a supematurally meritorious act.
This dispositio [fatum dicitur dispositio] (92) may very naturally be identified in single instances with the dispositio or habitude that must exist between mover and moved if the one is to move the other [i.e., Aristotelian praemotio]: thus, we have the idea of physical premotion which is necessary quo actualiter agat.
The Bannezians insist on an intrinsic distinction between sufficient and efficacious grace: one premotion causes the will to produce an indeliberate act, thereby conferring on the potency the capacity to produce (posse agere) a deliberate act; another, wholly distinct premotion causes the will actually to produce (actu agere) a deliberate act.
Osborne, Jr., Thomist Premotion and Contemporary Philosophy of Religion, 4 NOVA ET VETERA 607-32 (2006).
She focuses mainly (though not exclusively) on Malebranche's last work, the Reflections on Physical Premotion, which has received very little sustained attention from Anglo-American commentators.
I give one example, derived from her star text, the Reflections on Physical Premotion: 'God is the only efficacious cause of all the modifications, and the real changes that occur in substances' (italics added).
might have engaged in a fuller dialogue on the question involved, namely, the Thomist doctrine on physical premotion. In the context of his treatment of the notion of created grace (25-34), it seems that he would have done well to address the theological problems perennially arising from the mystery of reconciling the intrinsic efficacy of divine grace and the realism of human freedom and responsibility.