preoperational


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preoperational

(ˌpriːɒpəˈreɪʃənəl)
adj
(Psychology) relating to a stage of cognitive development in children, as theorized by Jean Piaget
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
According to this model, the problem-specific narrative may evolve in a way that mirrors cognitive development as posited by Piaget (1926): sensorimotor, preoperational, concrete operations, and formal operations (see Table 1).
The effects of the San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station (SONGS) on the giant kelp Macrocystis pyrifera: final preoperational monitoring report.
Almanacs, said the FBI, can be used by terrorists "to assist with target selection and preoperational planning." Because almanacs contain information, often accompanied by photographs and maps, about waterways, bridges, dams, reservoirs, tunnels, buildings, and roads, anyone carrying such a thing might be a terrorist or a friend of a terrorist.
According to Piaget, however, children between ages 2 and 7 are in the preoperational stage of cognitive development, which is characterized by increased symbolic-representational ability (Bornstein & Lamb, 1999).
Piaget believed the process of knowing begins at birth and continues through four stages of intellectual development: sensorimotor, preoperational, concrete operational, and formal operational.
But a new grassroots advocacy organization is contending that the preoperational consent forms given to patients in teaching hospitals don't explicitly state that a medical resident or student may conduct a pelvic exam while a patient is unconscious.
The development of symbolic play continues throughout much of what has been termed the early preoperational period of cognitive development (i.e., 2-4 years of age).
These may be compared with the Piagetian sensorimotor/ preoperational stages (1953; 1972), or Bruner's enactive phase of learning (1974).
Piaget's first stage in individual cognitive development occurs between the ages of two and seven for a child and is labeled "preoperational." At this primitive stage, the one at which "magic" plays a key role in cognitive development, the child has difficulty distinguishing fantasy from reality.
The preoperational child may perceive God or religion in very simple or even magical terms, whereas the concrete-operational child may have a more logical view of the role of religion.
[4] When a young child with preoperational cognitive maturity clearly sees exactly the same amount of water being poured into a thin glass and as that being poured into a wider glass, it is common sense to him that the thin glass has more water in it because the water level is higher.