Pressburg


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Pressburg

(ˈprɛsbʊrk)
n
(Placename) the German name for Bratislava
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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Noun1.Pressburg - capital and largest city of Slovakia
Slovak Republic, Slovakia - a landlocked republic in central Europe; separated from the Czech Republic in 1993
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
In 1683, the Ottomans reached the gates of Vienna and although Leopold, with the help from Poland, managed to defeat them, many soldiers and ordinary people fell into captivity.The Church of Saints John of Matha and Felix of Valois class="ulbuilt by the Order of Trinitariansconstruction began in 1717consecrated on July 7, 1725served as a cathedral temple of the Military Ordinariate of the Armed Forces of the Slovak Republic (2003-2009) until the St Sebastian's Cathedral in Krasany was builtThen archbishop Leopold Koloni initiated the arrival of the order to Pressburg, nowadays Bratislava.
Which European capital city was formerly known as Pressburg? 10.
The beautifully restored palace houses portraits of Habsburg royalty, an exquisite collection of rare tapestries and the Hall of Mirrors, where the Treaty of Pressburg between Austria and France was signed in 1805.
1805 - Peace of Pressburg is signed between France and Austria.
Stephan Ladislaus Endlicher-Stephan Ladislaus Endlicher (1804-1849) was born in Pressburg, a German-speaking town in the Austro-Hungarian Empire in 1804.
Charles Pressburg, 44, entered a guilty plea to a single count of negligently wounding another.
Devin was reduced to rubble by Napoleon's retreating army after his unsuccessful siege of Pressburg in 1809, which is about ten kilometres downstream of the Danube from the fortress.
The Cases of the Battles of Pressburg (907) and Lechfeld (955)"; Joseph Wallace, "Astrology and Politics in John Selden's Edition of the Marmora Arundelliana"; and Christine Wulf, "Burgerlicher Spathumanismus in Inschriften."
Bratislava (Pozsony, Pressburg), issued a special jubilee edition
In the next room, a map of Vienna from 1430 showed Bratislava (then known as Pressburg in German, Presporok in Slovak and Pozsony in Hungarian) as little more than a suburb of the Austrian capital.
A century ago, when Bratislava was still known as Pressburg, what is now Slovakia was far more ethnically diverse than it is now.