pressure gradient

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pressure gradient

n
1. (General Physics) the change of pressure per unit distance. See adverse pressure gradient, favourable pressure gradient
2. (Physical Geography) meteorol the decrease in atmospheric pressure per unit of horizontal distance, shown on a synoptic chart by the spacing of the isobars
References in periodicals archive ?
Figure 8 (b, d, and f) depicts the pressure gradients downstream of the U-bend.
The heating and cooling of the ground over non-flat terrain generate horizontal temperature differences which, in turn, cause horizontal pressure gradients that produce diurnal wind circulations (Wagner, 1938; Defant, 1949; Whiteman, 2000).
Patients with cirrhosis and esophageal varices have hepatic venous pressure gradients of 10-12 mm Hg.
Water moves freely between intra-cellular and extra-cellular compartments in response to osmotic pressure gradients created by effective solutes (Na+, K+, and mannitol) that are impermeable to the cell membrane (1).
Users can determine the degree of sophistication and ease of use for their needs, from the R200 for 50- to 3000-mL flasks, to the top model R-205 Professional with fully automated vacuum control, pressure gradients and automatic distillation down to dryness.
The projected wind speed due to pressure gradients caused by the differential heating over land and water is computed to be 6.
Different test heads with different test areas can easily be fitted to the instrument, and 11 pre-programmed pressure gradients and pressure programs make it possible to test in compliance with any known standard.
Because of the pressure gradients and flow forces within the lymphotomes, fluid does not cross the watershed in a healthy, normal person.
Permanent reactive barriers', however, such as the CSIRO--University of WA system, can be used underground and should be cheaper overall because natural hydraulic pressure gradients push the water through the cleansing barriers, removing the need for pumping.
Natural underwater temperature and pressure gradients create a corridor in which sound can travel for thousands of kilometers.
As the discs rotate, kinetic energy is transferred through layers of fluid molecules passing between the discs, generating velocity and pressure gradients until the entire fluid mass is in motion.