presupposition

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Related to Presuppositions: presupposing

pre·sup·pose

 (prē′sə-pōz′)
tr.v. pre·sup·posed, pre·sup·pos·ing, pre·sup·pos·es
1. To believe or suppose in advance: "In passing moral judgments ... we presuppose that a man's actions, and hence also his being a good or a bad man, are in his power" (Leo Strauss).
2. To require or involve necessarily as an antecedent condition: "The term tax relief ... presupposes a conceptual metaphor: Taxes are an affliction" (George Lakoff).

pre·sup′po·si′tion (prē-sŭp′ə-zĭsh′ən) n.
pre·sup′po·si′tion·al adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.presupposition - the act of presupposing; a supposition made prior to having knowledge (as for the purpose of argument)
supposal, supposition - the cognitive process of supposing
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

presupposition

noun assumption, theory, belief, premise, hypothesis, presumption, preconception, supposition, preconceived idea the presupposition that human life must be sustained for as long as possible
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

presupposition

noun
Something taken to be true without proof:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

presupposition

[ˌpriːsʌpəˈzɪʃən] Npresuposición f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

presupposition

[ˌpriːsʌpəˈzɪʃən] nprésupposé m
the presupposition that ... → le présupposé selon lequel ...pre-tax [ˌpriːˈtæks] adj [earnings, losses, profits] → avant impôt(s)pre-teen preteen [ˌpriːˈtiːn]
npréadolescent(e) m/f
adjpréadolescent(e)
pre-teen children → les préadolescents
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

presupposition

Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

presupposition

[ˌpriːsʌpəˈzɪʃn] npresupposto
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
It has been often remarked that Descartes, having begun by dismissing all presuppositions, introduces several: he passes almost at once from scepticism to dogmatism.
As far as I have been able to divine the latent meaning of the objectors, it seems to originate in a presupposition that the people will be disinclined to the exercise of federal authority in any matter of an internal nature.
The Squire had been used to parish homage all his life, used to the presupposition that his family, his tankards, and everything that was his, were the oldest and best; and as he never associated with any gentry higher than himself, his opinion was not disturbed by comparison.
In order to understand the phrase "this morning" it is necessary that we should have a way of feeling time-intervals, and that this feeling should give what is constant in the meaning of the words "this morning." This appreciation of time-intervals is, however, obviously a product of memory, not a presupposition of it.
How are contents of pragmatics (speaker's intentions, presuppositions, frame, listener's interpretation, differences as barriers/noise, shared context) helpful in understanding communication cycle?
With all these presuppositions, she called on the IEC to furnish the council with answers.
Specifically, it highlights neglected advantages of this way of understanding the moral domain; explores important theoretical and practical presuppositions of relational moral duties; and considers the normative implications of understanding morality in relational terms.
In order to highlight the troubling nature of their communication, which can be concurrently disturbing and intriguing to the reader, this article examines how the characters' presuppositions are linguistically triggered and how they are exploited as prompts to the ensuing communication, through being ignored, dismissed, or accommodated by participants engaged in the confabulation.
In my senior year I took my first class on Japanese literature and suddenly realized that rather than being presuppositionless New Criticism in fact concealed many important presuppositions with its high value on ambiguity, irony, and metaphor, and, particularly with fiction, the additional expectations of conflict, complication, rising action, falling action, and denouement.
After identifying the presuppositions in the texts studied in terms of the topics identified, these propositions were placed into the two categories (order versus disorder) based on the bottom-up processing approach common in linguistic analysis for further examination.
Looking in turn at theology and the historiography of science, then at theology and the philosophical foundations and boundaries of science, he examines such topics as the historical roots of the conflict thesis, whether the Galileo affair was the smoking gun in the war between science and religion, general metaphysical presuppositions of science and their theological foundations, and whether science has limits.
Presuppositions are implicit assumptions that are especially difficult to challenge because they seem obvious, and mostly even go unrecognized as assumptions.