pretender

(redirected from Pretenders)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

pre·tend·er

 (prĭ-tĕn′dər)
n.
1. One who simulates, pretends, or alleges falsely; a hypocrite or dissembler.
2. One who sets forth a claim, especially a claimant to a throne.

pretender

(prɪˈtɛndə)
n
1. a person who pretends or makes false allegations
2. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a person who mounts a claim, as to a throne or title

pre•tend•er

(prɪˈtɛn dər)

n.
1. a person who pretends, esp. for a dishonest purpose.
2. an aspirant or claimant (often fol. by to): a pretender to the throne.
3. a person who makes unjustified or false claims.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Pretender - a claimant to the throne or to the office of ruler (usually without just title)
claimant - someone who claims a benefit or right or title; "claimants of unemployment compensation"; "he was a claimant to the throne"
2.pretender - a person who makes deceitful pretensespretender - a person who makes deceitful pretenses
beguiler, cheater, deceiver, trickster, slicker, cheat - someone who leads you to believe something that is not true
name dropper - someone who pretends that famous people are his/her friends
ringer - a contestant entered in a competition under false pretenses
3.pretender - a person who professes beliefs and opinions that he or she does not hold in order to conceal his or her real feelings or motivespretender - a person who professes beliefs and opinions that he or she does not hold in order to conceal his or her real feelings or motives
beguiler, cheater, deceiver, trickster, slicker, cheat - someone who leads you to believe something that is not true
charmer, smoothie, smoothy, sweet talker - someone with an assured and ingratiating manner
Tartufe, Tartuffe - a hypocrite who pretends to religious piety (after the protagonist in a play by Moliere)
whited sepulcher, whited sepulchre - a person who is inwardly evil but outwardly professes to be virtuous

pretender

noun claimant, claimer, aspirant the Comte de Paris, pretender to the French throne

pretender

noun
2. One who sets forth a claim to a royal title:
Translations

pretender

[prɪˈtendəʳ] Npretendiente mf
pretender to the thronepretendiente mf al trono
the Young Pretenderel joven Pretendiente

pretender

[prɪˈtɛndər] nprétendant(e) m/f
pretender to sth → prétendant à qch

pretender

n (to throne) → Prätendent(in) m(f) (→ to auf +acc)

pretender

[prɪˈtɛndəʳ] n (to the throne) → pretendente m/f
References in classic literature ?
This babel of inventors and pretenders amazed Bell and disconcerted his backers.
These fellows are pretenders in a double sense," said one of the party; "they can do nothing which it is worth one's while to be made a dupe by.
And do you not also think, as I do, that the harsh feeling which the many entertain towards philosophy originates in the pretenders, who rush in uninvited, and are always abusing them, and finding fault with them, who make persons instead of things the theme of their conversation?
While the servants were busied in providing materials, the surgeon, who imputed the backwardness which had appeared in Sophia to her fears, began to comfort her with assurances that there was not the least danger; for no accident, he said, could ever happen in bleeding, but from the monstrous ignorance of pretenders to surgery, which he pretty plainly insinuated was not at present to be apprehended.
To say what good of fashion we can, it rests on reality, and hates nothing so much as pretenders; to exclude and mystify pretenders and send them into everlasting 'Coventry,' is its delight.
As to the clerks, he pronounced them mere pretenders, not one of whom had ever been among the Indians, nor farther to the northwest than Montreal, nor of higher rank than barkeeper of a tavern or marker of a billiard-table, excepting one, who had been a school-master, and whom he emphatically sets down for "as foolish a pedant as ever lived.
The local witch-doctor, knowing his own medicine better than any other knew it, was jealous of all other pretenders to accomplishments in the black art.
But it is necessary to know well how to disguise this characteristic, and to be a great pretender and dissembler; and men are so simple, and so subject to present necessities, that he who seeks to deceive will always find someone who will allow himself to be deceived.
He heard the Highland battle-cry and the clash of steel on steel, for fighting came near his home, and his own people joined the standard of the Pretender.
In her handling a ship will not put up with a mere pretender, as, for instance, the public will do with Mr.
The Tories were violently turned out of office; Oxford was imprisoned, and Bolingbroke, having fled to the Pretender, was declared a traitor.
Engaging, heart and soul, in his pursuits of sowing, planting, and gathering, Van Baerle, caressed by the whole fraternity of tulip-growers in Europe, entertained nor the least suspicion that there was at his very door a pretender whose throne he had usurped.